newspaper headlines

SophieD

Senior Member
FRANCE - FRENCH
The headlines read :

MATTY, GANG GUILTY ;
HANDED 5-25 YEARS !

We know that Matty is the head of a gang.
Could you please rephrase the above headline ? It would help me to translate it.
Does it mean : Matty and his gang found guilty
Their sentences go from 5 to 25 years (meaning that the shortest prison sentence for one - or several - members of the gang is five years, and the longest 25, with other sentences in between) ?
 
  • Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The headlines read :

    MATTY, GANG GUILTY ;
    HANDED 5-25 YEARS !

    We know that Matty is the head of a gang.
    Could you please rephrase the above headline ? It would help me to translate it.
    Does it mean : Matty and his gang found guilty :tick:
    Their sentences go from 5 to 25 years (meaning that the shortest prison sentence for one - or several - members of the gang is five years, and the longest 25, with other sentences in between) ? Maybe.

    The sentences might be for different lengths of time for different members, or the might be a range of time for each member. Sentences in the U.S. often are for a minimum to a maximum term, with the actual length depending on the person's behavior in prison and other factors. This leads to the phrase "time off for good behavior", meaning prison time off the possible sentence.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    The headlines read :

    MATTY, GANG GUILTY ;
    HANDED 5-25 YEARS !

    We know that Matty is the head of a gang.
    Could you please rephrase the above headline ? It would help me to translate it.
    Does it mean : Matty and his gang found guilty
    Their sentences go from 5 to 25 years (meaning that the shortest prison sentence for one - or several - members of the gang is five years, and the longest 25, with other sentences in between) ?

    We may know that Matty is the head of a gang but those headlines don't tell us if Matty has been found guilty - Matty may not yet be in custody, nor even under a charge. Matty's gang may not include Matty in newspaper headline-ese.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    We may know that Matty is the head of a gang but those headlines don't tell us if Matty has been found guilty - Matty may not yet be in custody, nor even under a charge. Matty's gang may not include Matty in newspaper headline-ese. :confused:

    I'm not sure I agree, maxiogee. :) To me, the comma in the headline suggests both Matty and the gang are guilty. I'd have your interpretation if it were "Matty's Gang Guilty" instead of "Matty, Gang Guilty".
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I see the comma as exclusionary. If there were an '&' - or even no punctuation between 'Matty' and 'Gang' then maybe I would be pleased to learn that Matty was off the streets for a few years.
    As it is I can only assume that Matty is a well-known crook (at least within the newspaper's circulation area), that the trial has already gained notoriety within this area.
    In a similar vein we had a notorious politician in Ireland and it was not uncommon to see newspaper placards with headlines such as "Haughey, aide charged" which would mean to all and sundry here that one person was charged with a criminal act - an aide to Charles Haughey.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In a similar vein we had a notorious politician in Ireland and it was not uncommon to see newspaper placards with headlines such as "Haughey, aide charged" which would mean to all and sundry here that one person was charged with a criminal act - an aide to Charles Haughey.


    If I saw a headline like that, I would interpret it to mean Haughey AND his aide were charged. So we may have yet another AE - B[I?]E difference here. :)
     
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