next month / the next month

languagesinmind

Member
spanish
Dear all,

I am glad to share again ideas and questions here in wordreference.com
Recently, I was checking an exam and I saw this sentence:
Yes, Probably I __________ go to Cartagena, But I __________ travel to San Andres the next month for sure.
It sounds wrong to me to say *the next month but I wanted to read your suggestions about it and I also want to know if this is possible in some cases.

Thanks!
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you're speaking now (in march), "next month" means April. If you're speaking of what you're going to do in April and May, you can say "I'm going to X in April and to Y the next month."
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I am glad to share again ideas and questions here in wordreference.com
    Recently, I was checking an exam and I saw this sentence:
    Yes, Probably I __________ go to Cartagena, But I __________ travel to San Andres the next month for sure.
    It sounds wrong to me to say *the next month but I wanted to read your suggestions about it and I also want to know if this is possible in some cases.

    I agree with what the other two have said, and in this exact sentence, the article is necessary because the speaker will not be traveling to San Andres in April 2016 (the next month from now), but rather at some unspecified point in the future after April.

    Ex.
    Yes, I will probably go to Cartagena in June, but I will travel to San Andres the next month [July] for sure.

    In general:
    next month = el mes que viene
    the next month = el mes siguiente
     

    ThOF77

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    Me da la sensación de que el tema va así (quizás me equivoque):

    La primera vez que hablas de fechas en la conversación, sería "next month" (o "next week" o "tomorrow)

    Una vez ya has dicho algo sobre fechas y luego vuelves a hacer referencia a otra fecha, entonces ya sería con el "the" delante "the next month", "the next week")

    Ejemplo:

    Tomorrow I will go to Barcelona but then I will return to Madrid the next week ("mañana iré a Barcelona pero luego volveré a Madrid a la semana próxima/siguiente")
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Me da la sensación de que el tema va así (quizás me equivoque):

    La primera vez que hablas de fechas en la conversación, sería "next month" (o "next week" o "tomorrow)

    Una vez ya has dicho algo sobre fechas y luego vuelves a hacer referencia a otra fecha, entonces ya sería con el "the" delante "the next month", "the next week")

    Ejemplo:

    Tomorrow I will go to Barcelona but then I will return to Madrid the next week ("mañana iré a Barcelona pero luego volveré a Madrid a la semana próxima/siguiente")

    No, that is incorrect. No matter how many times you have mentioned the date, you must use or not use the article according to what was said above in this thread. Your sentence should be as follows.

    Tomorrow I will go to Barcelona, but then I will return to Madrid next week.
    Or
    In two weeks I will go to Barcelona, but then I will return to Madrid the next week (or, the week after that / the following week).
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    "Next month", with no article, refers to the month that follows "this month". Since this month is March, next month (no article) is April. As long as this month is March, next month will always be April.

    But the month that follows any other month is "the next month", always with the article. For example, a few months ago was October and the next month was November, and it will soon be May and the next month will be June.

    Think of "next month", with no article, like the word "tomorrow". It refers to the month that follows "this month" just as "tomorrow" refers to the day that follows "today". Since today is Sunday, tomorrow is Monday. But the day that follows any other day is "the next day", not "tomorrow":

    Thursday was a few days ago. The next day was Friday, and the next, Saturday. Today is Sunday, and tomorrow is Monday. The next day is Tuesday, and the next, Wednesday.
    Thursday was a few days ago. Tomorrow:cross: was Friday, and tomorrow:cross:, Saturday. Today is Sunday, and tomorrow:tick: is Monday. Tomorrow:cross: is Tuesday, and tomorrow:cross:, Wednesday.


    October was a few months ago. The next month was November, and the next, December. This month is March, and next month is April. The next month will be May, and the next, June.
    October was a few months ago. Next month:cross: was November, and next:cross:, December. This month is March, and next month:tick: is April. Next month:cross: will be May, and next:cross:, June.
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    O sea, creo que deberías entenderlo así.
    Next month = el próximo/siguiente mes.
    The next month = el próximo/siguiente más. (No añadimos "mes" porque ya entendemos que estamos hablando de ello).

    A- ¿Cuándo tienes vacaciones?
    B- El próximo mes (Next month, responderían en inglés, o sea, en abril)
    B- ¿Y tú?
    A- El próximo más. (The next month ... entenderían ambos que se refiere a mayo)
     

    yads

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese (Taiwan)
    May I ask if "the next month" and "next month" are interchangeable in this case:
    "(The) next month will be tough because it is peak season."
    For instance, it is June right now. I am referring to July.
    Thank you as always.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    May I ask if "the next month" and "next month" are interchangeable in this case:
    "(The) next month will be tough because it is peak season."
    For instance, it is June right now. I am referring to July.
    Thank you as always.
    No.

    "The next month" means "the (approximately) thirty days starting today."
    "Next month" means "July."
     

    Michael_Goldman

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No.

    "The next month" means "the (approximately) thirty days starting today."
    "Next month" means "July."
    Is "the next" day, month, year etc. always about today, when today is the reference point to count the mentioned period from?

    Today is Thursday, so:
    The next day is Friday
    The next month is 30 days from today
    The next year is 365 days from today?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Is "the next" day, month, year etc. always about today, when today is the reference point to count the mentioned period from?

    Today is Thursday, so:
    The next day is Friday
    The next month is 30 days from today
    The next year is 365 days from today?
    No. If you mean "tomorrow", don't say "the next day". If you mean "next month", don't say "the next month".
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Is "the next" day, month, year etc. always about today, when today is the reference point to count the mentioned period from?

    Today is Thursday, so:
    1. The next day is Friday
    2. The next month is 30 days from today
    3. The next year is 365 days from today?

    (I have numbered the above for reference.)

    #1 would never be used to mean "tomorrow," but could be used to refer to a future day. For example, "They are getting married on a Thursday, so the next day is Friday, and they're going to make it a long weekend."

    #2 and #3 are both correct when referring to a time period, rather than a calendar unit.

    Ex.
    (today is the 23rd of June)
    This job is going to take about 30 days, and the next month will be hard on all of us. (from now until about the 23rd of July)
    This job is going to take about 12 months, and the next year will be hard on all of us. (from now until about the 23rd of June, 2023

    Compare the above with these:
    This job is going to take about 30 days, and next month will be hard on all of us. (the month of July)
    This job is going to take about 12 months, and next year will be hard on all of us. (the year 2023)
     

    Michael_Goldman

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    (I have numbered the above for reference.)

    #1 would never be used to mean "tomorrow," but could be used to refer to a future day. For example, "They are getting married on a Thursday, so the next day is Friday, and they're going to make it a long weekend."

    #2 and #3 are both correct when referring to a time period, rather than a calendar unit.

    Ex.
    (today is the 23rd of June)
    This job is going to take about 30 days, and the next month will be hard on all of us. (from now until about the 23rd of July)
    This job is going to take about 12 months, and the next year will be hard on all of us. (from now until about the 23rd of June, 2023

    Compare the above with these:
    This job is going to take about 30 days, and next month will be hard on all of us. (the month of July)
    This job is going to take about 12 months, and next year will be hard on all of us. (the year 2023)
    Thank very much for such a detailed reply. Had everyone been so scrupulous, but a few here.

    I am reading a book now, and here is a part of the sentence: '... her funeral was late the next morning ...'. The full text attached, the finger points to the part.
    Why wouldn't the author say 'tomorrow morning'?
     

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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    '... her funeral was late the next morning ...'.
    Why wouldn't the author say 'tomorrow morning'?

    Because "tomorrow" is only used in reference to "today," which is the present day to the reader. In the book, the funeral took place on the day after the day referenced elsewhere. If it said "tomorrow morning," that would refer to the next day from the reader's perspective.

    I don't speak Chinese, but this rule also applies to both Spanish and Japanese.
     
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