Next "universal" language

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Miguelillo 87

Senior Member
México español
Hi everybody, Me and my friends have always discuss about wish language it’s going to be the next to be “universal” As you should know, Many languages through the history had been leader the world for many years or centuries, For example, When The Rome empire was leading the world , everybody try to speak it language, When Napoleon conquest almost all Europe was French, When was the second W W it was German , in The Aztecs time Everybody n Mesoamerica spoke nahualt (I think so I’m not sure which one was the language of the Aztecs) In the Cold War, it was Russian and English, and Nowadays English it’s the universal language.
But we know and history has teaches us that this is not going to last forever, so My friend and I have decided the three languages that we think can be the next “universal language”

- Chinese ( mandarin), Why? Because We think China it’s one of the nation which it’s taking more advantages of the globalisation, and it’s becoming really powerful and could be a nation with a big economical power in order to take the power to USA and in a few years.

- German.- We believe Germany it’s one of the most important nations on EU, and one of the most developed, also Germany it’s one of the leaders on technology, medicine and science.


- Spanish.- It’s one of the most spoken languages all around the world, Also Latin-America (Spanish it’s the first language on America)it’s growing and it’s a important target for many investor of all the world.


So what it’s your opinion 4 you which languages could be and why?
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    some language suggestions, tocayo. :)
    Miguelillo 87 said:
    Hi everybody, Me and my friends have always talked about wish language it’s going to be the next to be “universal” one. As you might know, Many languages through the history had been leader of the world for many years or centuries, For example, When The Roman empire was leading the world , everybody tried to speak its language, When Napoleon conquered almost all Europe it was French, When was the second W W it was German , in The Aztecs' time Everybody n Mesoamerica spoke nahualt (I think so I’m not sure which one was the language of the Aztecs) In the Cold War, it was Russian and English, and Nowadays English is the universal language.
    But we know and history has taught us that this is not going to last forever, so My friend and I have decided the three languages that we think might/may be the next “universal language”

    - Chinese ( mandarin), Why? Because We think China is one of the nations which is taking more advantages of the globalisation, and it’s becoming really powerful and could be a nation with a big economical power in order to take the power from the USA and in a few years.

    - German.- We believe Germany it’s one of the most important nations in the EU, and one of the most developed, also Germany is one of the leaders on technology, medicine and science.

    - Spanish.- It’s one of the most spoken languages all around the world, Also Latin-America (Spanish it’s the first language on America)it’s growing and it’s a important target for many investor of all the world.

    So what is your opinion? For you, which languages might it be and why?
    German was not a "universal" language during World War II -- it became the language of science in the 1800's because of German domination of science prior to WWII. Outside of scientific communities, I doubt whether German reached "universal" status, despite Nazi dominance.

    The Aztecs spoke Nahuatl, but there were many other nations in America when the Europeans arrived -- and each group had its own language or dialect. I don't know how many non-Mejicas spoke Nahuatl, but I suspect that the language didn't stretch beyond Aztec lands and its fiefdoms.

    I don't know if Russian was a lingua franca of the Communist Bloc during the cold war, but it certainly wasn't a "universal" language. It showed promise of reaching universality for about 2 years after glasnost, when every Business Administration student studied Russian because that market was set to be the next big thing.... but then everything fizzled and the only Russian that even comes close to universality is one word: pjalsta. :rolleyes:

    In order that people in faraway places study a foreign language, there has to be a compelling reason for them to do so... almost always an economic reason. Despite the geographic spread of Spanish, I don't think that the Latin American market shows such potential to become a dominant force in the world and cause people in Mongolia and Mozambique to choose to study Spanish. China, on the other hand...
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Well, I think that Chinese couldn't be the one, because for one simple reason: it's too complicated. English has become today's "lingua franca" precisely for being os synthetic and simple. No cases, no declinations, nouns that can be used as adjectives... The basic English in order to communicate is very easy to learn, which is not the case with Chinese...

    I vote for Spanish. Maybe there is no big or powerful enough market in Latin America, but the Latin culture becomes very, but VERY popular in the world... Even though I am not sure if you and I will live long enough to see it... English is simply, too powerful at the moment...
     

    Cereth

    Senior Member
    Español
    mm i think that english is a very utilized language not only because USA and UK have a big economical and industrial power...i think that the success of english language is that is easy to learn, speaking in future, using auxiliars all that is so easy to understand (in comparison to spanish and japanese for example...)
    i think that chinese is not only difficult to write/read but so difficult to speak!! and which chinese are you considering?? mandarin, cantonese, putong tua (i don´t if it is well written).

    I think english will be ruling more and more years...
    It is suitable i think...
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    I really do not find Spanish that difficult so as to compare it to Japanese...:eek:

    It is just another Indo-European language, and that is why it is much easier than any Asian language... Grammar basics are the same, as in all Indo-European languages...
    Why do all Spanish speakers think their language is so difficult when it is not?:D

    That is why I do not consider any non-Indo-European language as new "lingua franca".... Slavic languages, neither, because their grammar is too complicated. It must be some Roman language, if ever English looses its power and popularity that has right now....
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    I think that if China becomes a superpower then people will learn Mandarin no matter how difficult it is.

    The only thing is, the difficulty of learning Written Chinese will present itself as a trade barrier. People overseas would have to spend lots of time and money to train people in using Chinese characters in order to trade with China, which will cut into profits. This is a pragmatic reason why China should adopt a phonetic-based writing system.
     

    danielfranco

    Senior Member
    I think it's very difficult to guess which language might gain ascendancy as the lingua franca of our world in the years to come, after English makes its exit stage-left. I remember back in the eighties everyone thought we ought to start learning Japanese 'cause we all thought they were taking over. Nowdays we think perhaps we should learn some Chinese. Whatever. I think perhaps the Chinese are thinking right now, "maybe we ought to be learning some English if we want to take over the world market?"
    When I was a kid it was still more fashionable to speak French as a second language than English. And that wasn't so long ago, either, alright? Don't think I'm older than dirt, okay?
    So, really, there's no telling... Spanish? Maaaaaaaaybe, but my uneducated guess is that English is more likely to adapt to the onslaught of foreign words and to use them than other languages (really, who would have thought that words like "mustang, lasso, fuselage, etc." were once foreign words?) so maybe the next "universal" language will be some form of bastardized (or modernized, depending on you point of view) English.
     

    justjukka

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - USA
    Technology will have a great influence on our future's languages. When the topic is brought up in conversation, many thoughts turn to Japan. Their compuer languages have proven most useful for technological development. However, I've heard that English is the most easily scripted language for computers. Someday, perhaps the universal language could be a composition of the families the two languages are from.
     

    ERASMO_GALENO

    Senior Member
    Perú, Español
    Hi,

    Have you ever heard about the Esperanto? It's supposed to be a universal language, built from several ones, but I think a lot of us hasn't even heard about it.

    Greetings,

    Erasmo.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I don't think Esperanto will ever take hold. I think the future dominant language will remain as English, and maybe even Spanish. Chinese sounds enticing, but I don't think it's a realistic language for everyone to learn.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Mod NOTE: There are already several threads concerning the topics of artificial languages, including esperanto. You are welcome to discuss those languages in those threads. For the purposes of this thread, please keep to the topic of current "natural" languages. Thank you.
     

    ozon

    Member
    catalan catalunya
    what about love? this one is universal and is older than the human being. ja ja ja. Seriously what abuot a mixture? a new one? becouse the actual global movement of peopel glovally, a mixture of English and spanish... Spanglish! I have eared it befor... I'm with DanielF.
    About the computer lenguage... morse?
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    I think no artificial language can get to be in real use, so therefore it is out of the question that any artificial language becomes "lingua franca". It must be alive language. Which one...? Well, I have alredy said what I think.:)
     

    hedonist

    Senior Member
    america
    Chinese (mandarin? cantonese?) could be a contender. They're making huge strides in their economy and that would probably mean that they would have a bigger influence and say in world matters in years to come.
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    fenixpollo said:
    I don't know if Russian was a lingua franca of the Communist Bloc during the cold war, but it certainly wasn't a "universal" language. It showed promise of reaching universality for about 2 years after glasnost, when every Business Administration student studied Russian because that market was set to be the next big thing.... but then everything fizzled and the only Russian that even comes close to universality is one word: pjalsta. :rolleyes:
    Russian used to be the universal language for countries ruled by Communists - children in Poland, for instance, had to learn Russian at school.
    As for Russian words which have become universal... Well, there's a number of Russian words that are pretty well-known. But they all seems to come into English and other languages long ago.

    So what it’s your opinion 4 you which languages could be and why?
    Spanish, I think. It's spoken in Europe and throughout both Americas, so Spanish has all the chances to become the nexp universal language.
    I'd rather see Italian, one of my most favoutite languages, as the language of international communication, though. :)
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Etcetera said:
    Russian used to be the universal language for countries ruled by Communists - children in Poland, for instance, had to learn Russian at school.

    Well, in my country, one of four languages that could be learnt in school was Russian. Somehow, people who learnt Russian at school, they never learnt it good enough to speak it, unless those who actually wanted to study it at the University. On the other hand, people who learnt English, French or German, do know to speak it even though languages are not their occupation now. I think that Russian in my country wasn't very popular... Sorry, Etcetera...:)
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    natasha2000 said:
    Well, in my country, one of four languages that could be learnt in school was Russian. Somehow, people who learnt Russian at school, they never learnt it good enough to speak it, unless those who actually wanted to study it at the University. On the other hand, people who learnt English, French or German, do know to speak it even though languages are not their occupation now. I think that Russian in my country wasn't very popular... Sorry, Etcetera...:)
    Why are you sorry, Natasha? :) I doubt if studying Russian can be a great pleasure for those who were just forced to do it. Let alone that English or even German are less difficult to learn than Russian.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Etcetera said:
    Why are you sorry, Natasha? :) I doubt if studying Russian can be a great pleasure for those who were just forced to do it. Let alone that English or even German are less difficult to learn than Russian.

    No, Etcetera, you didn't understand...:D
    Nobody was forced to do it. It was just another foreign language we had in schools. So, if someone wasn't so gifted for languages, he would hate any language, not only Russian.
    The reason is the usefulness of the language. The most common sentence that was (is) heard is: Russian is spoken only in Russia. And English is spoken all over the world. French and German also prevailed over Russian, not as much as English, but they did, and for the same reason.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    Hi everybody, thanks for your answers, I know to establish a lingua franca it’s too difficult, I just want to know which one do you think it will be and I can see that a lot of people think Spanish it’s a good option (thanks!!!!), Also I can see English it’s still considerate as lingua franca for many, many years ,and I believe the same I mean English power it’s not going to finish from one day to another, but I believe and history has teaches us that anything it’s forever, so maybe our generation and the 3 next to it are gonna us English too, but maybe after that, the world will change.

    About my first post I say clearly that I was talking about Chinese mandarin, (for those who asked which type of Chinese I was talking about, by the way a lot of those), About Russian and German I know they were not a lingua franca all over the world but it was on its regions and a really big regions, I know I’m talking about a universal but it was only to give an example and to clarify the point I wanted to pointed out.

     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Honestly I would prefer anything to English...I want the attention off the west for once....maybe then nations will stop their westernizations (ie India).

    PS: I am refering to westernizing culture.
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    I don't think that there have ever been a universal language, meaning a language which was spoken by majority of Earth population. There have been languages of great importance in different times and in certain areas like Sanskrit, Persian, Russian, German, French, Latin, Greek etc. but the world at large have always been linguistically very divided.

    However, it looks that English has a very good chance to become such universal language in the near future. I have read that now there are more people speaking English as a second language than native speakers. It is projected that there will be 2.6 billion English speakers (at different proficiency levels though) by 2030. It will be very unprecedented in the world's history, however, there still will be more than 3 or 4 billion people using other languages in everyday's dealings. So, no worry, learning other languages will still be terribly useful thing to do.
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Etcetera said:
    Russian used to be the universal language for countries ruled by Communists - children in Poland, for instance, had to learn Russian at school.
    As for Russian words which have become universal... Well, there's a number of Russian words that are pretty well-known. But they all seems to come into English and other languages long ago.

    This may be true Etcetera, it was the same in Romania during the beginning of the 20th century. BUT almost everybody resented being forced to learn Russian! My grandmother told me how they were forced to learn Russian in school and that people hated it and suppressed it as soon as they got out of the classroom. If Russian really was a universal language, why did it take so little time for it to disappear from the former communist states (especially from Romania, more people knew French and German than Russian)??

    As for the "made up languages"; they will never and I repeat NEVER dominate in any future!

    I think that English will continue to dominate in the mere future. I doubt that Chinese or Spanish will take over the torch from English. I think that Arabic will become a very important language in the future. The Middle East is an economical melting pot, just waiting to burst.

    :) robbie
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    robbie_SWE said:
    This may be true Etcetera, it was the same in Romania during the beginning of the 20th century. BUT almost everybody resented being forced to learn Russian! My grandmother told me how they were forced to learn Russian in school and that people hated it and suppressed it as soon as they got out of the classroom. If Russian really was a universal language, why did it take so little time for it to disappear from the former communist states (especially from Romania, more people knew French and German than Russian)??
    I've always known that methods used by Communists were (and are!) up to no good. :)
    The situation vary from country to country, it seems. My Polish friend once told me that people of older generation still remember some Russian and are able to speak it. But, Polish is closer to Russian than Romanian. :)
     

    Samuel Hain

    Member
    Barbarian
    Miguelillo 87 said:
    - Chinese ( mandarin), Why? Because We think China it’s one of the nation which it’s taking more advantages of the globalisation, and it’s becoming really powerful and could be a nation with a big economical power in order to take the power to USA and in a few years.

    - German.- We believe Germany it’s one of the most important nations on EU, and one of the most developed, also Germany it’s one of the leaders on technology, medicine and science.


    - Spanish.- It’s one of the most spoken languages all around the world, Also Latin-America (Spanish it’s the first language on America)it’s growing and it’s a important target for many investor of all the world.

    Chinese - I don't thing so it will be in near future. Their do trade with Euro-American civilization, and this civilization in glabal is too lazy ti learn it. Therefore Chinese have to learn English.

    German - after WW I and WWII German nation feel some stigma, that's why a lot of them learn English.

    Spanish - maby, it depends on how many people from Iberoamerica moved to US, but I do not think they have enough economical and political power there.

    My opinion? It will be English - because US is still economical, cultural (I am so sorry that I have to say it, but how many Hollywood movies, American Pop stars and TV programmes do you know), political and military leader.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    I KNOW English it’s going to be a really strong language, for many many years, but some day will have to fall, so maybe another language or country will have the antorch and everybody will have to learn it. I know in this time seems to be improbable but remember nothing last forever
     

    hohodicestu

    Senior Member
    Mexico - Spanish
    Hi,

    Nothing in this world is guaranteed. As we all know today's international language is definitely English, but we have to keep in mind that things are changing constantly. So my guess for the future language could be a combination of related languages such as Spanish, portuguese, and English.

    :)
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    hohodicestu said:
    Hi,

    Nothing in this world is guaranteed. As we all know today's international language is definitely English, but we have to keep in mind that things are changing constantly. So my guess for the future language could be a combination of related languages such as Spanish, portuguese, and English.

    :)
    Why do you think portugese it's going to be one?
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    karuna said:
    So, no worry, learning other languages will still be terribly useful thing to do.

    I know nowadays it seems that English it’s going to reign forever, as your very good explanation has shown us, but as I said nothing last forever and as Napoleons Empire and Hitler and Roman Empire felt, English will do it too, I know it’s not gonna be tomorrow but it’s going to happen it’s for sure. So I wanted to know which language do you think will be the next to reign as English id doing it right now, So Karuna it seems you said English its’ going to continue dominating the world and it seems this forum too!!!
    Not.- Imagine if some day this forum will be full of Chinese symbols (if Chinese will be the one) that’s will be weird!!!!!
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    robbie_SWE said:
    . I think that Arabic will become a very important language in the future. The Middle East is an economical melting pot, just waiting to burst.

    :) robbie
    I would have never thinl about Arbic, it's good to see diferent point of view and to be truly it's not such a nonsense idea, I think it's a good option but I think matbe only in Middle Asia and parts of Europe but world wide I doubt it. But Who knows? (Sólo Dios sabe , I will say it in spanish)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I honestly do not see how anything could displace English. I don't envision a day where children will grow up taking Chinese language classes from kindergarden to 12th grade, with everyone else in the US. But I really would like to see another language push English aside.
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Miguelillo 87 said:
    I would have never thinl about Arbic, it's good to see diferent point of view and to be truly it's not such a nonsense idea, I think it's a good option but I think matbe only in Middle Asia and parts of Europe but world wide I doubt it. But Who knows? (Sólo Dios sabe , I will say it in spanish)

    Yeah, maybe you're right. Now that you mention it, I doubt that South American countries will do a lot of business with Arabic countries. But here in Europe anyway, I think it will be very important to know how to speak Arabic.

    (Entiendo español y soy verdad; sólo Dios sabe :) !)

    :) robbie
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    panjabigator said:
    I honestly do not see how anything could displace English. I don't envision a day where children will grow up taking Chinese language classes from kindergarden to 12th grade, with everyone else in the US. But I really would like to see another language push English aside.

    Consider this: 100 years ago people had a very hard time picturing a world where most things were in English and most people spoke English. During Napoleon's reign it was unthinkable that French will loose its dominance as the lingua franca. Even your ancestors, Panjabigator (I presume you come from India), couldn't picture themselves speaking in English (this before the British colonisation). Everything is relative!

    Greetings

    :) robbie
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    robbie_SWE said:
    Consider this: 100 years ago people had a very hard time picturing a world where most things were in English and most people spoke English. During Napoleon's reign it was unthinkable that French will loose its dominance as the lingua franca. Even your ancestors, Panjabigator (I presume you come from India), couldn't picture themselves speaking in English (this before the British colonisation). Everything is relative!

    Greetings

    :) robbie
    I totally agree with you Robbie I mean When countries or languages are on the power for too many years it’s really hard to believe that this situation will change, But we know it will change, That’s why I’m asking.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    panjabigator said:
    I honestly do not see how anything could displace English. I don't envision a day where children will grow up taking Chinese language classes from kindergarden to 12th grade, with everyone else in the US. But I really would like to see another language push English aside.
    Well I doubt it too if you speak for the next 60 or 70 yrs but maybe in 150 years things are not going to be the same, politic worlds and commercial world will change and everything will do it too, I also would like to see other language taking over of the world and displace English but unfortunately I think our generation it’s not gonna see it
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    Miguelillo 87 said:
    I know nowadays it seems that English it’s going to reign forever, as your very good explanation has shown us, but as I said nothing last forever and as Napoleons Empire and Hitler and Roman Empire felt, English will do it too, I know it’s not gonna be tomorrow but it’s going to happen it’s for sure. So I wanted to know which language do you think will be the next to reign as English id doing it right now, So Karuna it seems you said English its’ going to continue dominating the world and it seems this forum too!!!
    Not.- Imagine if some day this forum will be full of Chinese symbols (if Chinese will be the one) that’s will be weird!!!!!
    I am not sure that English will last forever. The differences between different "flavors" of English will only increase with time that they will become clearly separated dialects and with more time even separate languages. It is hard to predict how or how many centuries it will take but it all happened with Latin. Maybe people will learn so called International English for science or communication but speaking different type of English at home.

    Despite what writing system we use, a language is primarily speech, pronounced loudly or understood internally. For this reason I prefer phonetic writing systems. Of course, it beats to not be able to understand the dialect that your grandfathers spoke but symbolic writing hides the history of language development.
     

    übermönch

    Senior Member
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    panjabigator said:
    Honestly I would prefer anything to English...I want the attention off the west for once....
    Agreed. If there'd be a new election, non-indoeuropean languages like Malagasy, Kongolese or Vietnamese would be better choices, imho. Europe isn't the world's centre. Natasha2000 stated that IE languages were easier... well, they are. To indoeuropean speakers.:D
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    It is not the question what it should be, or what we would like to be or what's fair to be. If we took this criteria, then I could say I WOULD LIKE that Serbian becomes new lingua franca. But everyone here knows this is ridiculous asumption. Why? Because Serbian is spoken by very small number of people compared with world. So Übermonch sorry but the world will never see Kongolese or Vietnamese as new lingua franca, no matter how much you would like it.
    Besides the condition that it should be spoken by a larger number of people, the language also must be spoken by economically strong nation, and I don't see any Asiatic country which could substitute the US and the UK, or many other European countries. Again, sorry, but this is the fact.
    I might agree with those who said that China is an economical potential that is yet to be seen, but then, the difficulty of Chinese and its alphabet is a big obstacle for it. Compare any Indo-European language and Chinese, and you'll see what I am talking about. I've heard that not even all Chinese know all signs of their alphabet, because there are a couple of thousands of them (those who speak Chinese will forgive me my lack of precise information). And besides, we don't even know "which" Chinese would become lingua franca if it happens. According to what I read here in this forum, many times those who speak the language of China don't like this language to be called just Chinese, but they specify it as Mandarin, Cantonese etc... English is English, wherever you speak it. The same goes to Spanish or German. They do have their dialects and differences, but in the end, it is ONE language, and an American from Texas will be understood by an Irish from Dublin, or Australian from Sydney, as well as by any other citizen of this planet who speaks English.
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    And why cannot two languages share the position of lingua franca?
    I think English and Spanish have all chances to share this role. They're spoken throughout the world.
     

    polaco

    Member
    Poland/polish
    think that chinese is not only difficult to write/read but so difficult to speak!! and which chinese are you considering?? mandarin, cantonese, putong tua (i don´t if it is well written).

    Chinese is not difficult to speak. People can learn it, beeing there, in one year (basic phrases and most popular words.) Of course it can be hard to speak for spanish and englishspeaking pesons, because they for e.g. cannot imitate thank you - xie xie in putung hua (beijng dialect).
     

    polaco

    Member
    Poland/polish
    polaco said:
    think that chinese is not only difficult to write/read but so difficult to speak!! and which chinese are you considering?? mandarin, cantonese, putong tua (i don´t if it is well written).

    Chinese is not difficult to speak. People can learn it, beeing there, in one year (basic phrases and most popular words.) Of course it can be hard to speak for spanish and englishspeaking pesons, because they for e.g. cannot imitate thank you - xie xie in putung hua (beijng dialect).

    I forgot to add, that I'm voting for español.
     

    Loquacious

    New Member
    English, The United States
    If I were to choose a language to become "universal", it would be French. My opinion is, of course terribly biased with me being a francophile, but either way I would like to Fench returning to a dominant position in the political world at least.

    As to what will most likely happen, I say English or Chinese. English because we have absorbed the words of so many other languages into our linguistic arsenal. I believe people are forgetting that English became "universal" because England created an empire that stretched across the entire globe. North America, Africa, Asia, Australia (an entire continent, no less!), an itsy bitsy bit of South America, and then of course the island base in Europe. That's quite a bit of land, all ruled by the English-speaking British Crown for a time until those territories sought independence. Their may not be a British Empire anymore, but their surely is an English-speaking one.

    I also mentioned Chinese as a possiblity. It is a rising economic power, but the language seems very complex, and one should also note that almost all the universal languages that the world has experienced have used the Roman Alphabet.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    Well Loquacious also Spain made an Empire in Africa, Asia and AMERICA, and now Spanish natives are more tan English natives. That’s why I said that Spanish it’s a very good option for the next lingua franca.
     

    Loquacious

    New Member
    English, The United States
    Spain may have had the largest colonial empire for a time, but it couldn't maintain its influence. Africa was dominated by the French, Spain's claims on North America were denied by the newly-formed United States... South America may have been taken by the Spanish and the Portuguese, but England was able to maintain their empire and ensure English as the dominant communication form.

    Also do you see any Hispanic superpowers climbing onto the world stage? Superpowers are what we are looking for when predicting future universal languages. In the past, empires determned the lingua franca, and today's empires take the form of superpowers.
     
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