"Niño" in an american war context?

Smurfan

Senior Member
Swedish
Hi! I'm having some trouble with the meaning of a word. I know it is spanish, but the natives in the english-spanish forum could not recognize the meaning of the context, so I thought since it appears in an english novel, maybe it is a loan word from spanish and has a different meaning in english :) . I'm reading Hemingways "Islands in the stream" and they are soldiers on a boat, and the always carry with them a "niño". The literal meaning is "child", but there must be another menaing here:

"Ara," he called down.
Ara came up and said, "Yes, Tom."
"Check out three niños with six clips apiece and put them in the boat with a dozen frags and the middle-size aid kit. ( ... )"


Can you make any sense out of it? Thanks;)!
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Hi! I'm having some trouble with the meaning of a word. I know it is spanish, but the natives in the english-spanish forum could not recognize the meaning of the context, so I thought since it appears in an english novel, maybe it is a loan word from spanish and has a different meaning in english :) . I'm reading Hemingways "Islands in the stream" and they are soldiers on a boat, and the always carry with them a "niño". The literal meaning is "child", but there must be another menaing here:

    "Ara," he called down.
    Ara came up and said, "Yes, Tom."
    "Check out three niños with six clips apiece and put them in the boat with a dozen frags and the middle-size aid kit. ( ... )"


    Can you make any sense out of it? Thanks;)!

    As with cuchuflete, I can only assume that it is a small-sized weapon.
     
    Top