nicht den Lehrauftrag für Physiologie besäße

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Löwenfrau

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Could you please check if I'm understanding this phrase correctly?

"Du Bois-Reymond bekämpfte diesen Neo-Vitalismus in seiner Weise; er gestand zu, daß er mit so tiefen Sätzen wie die von Bunge einen Sinn nicht verbinden könnte, und berief sich darauf, daß Bunge nicht den Lehrauftrag für Physiologie besäße, also über das Lebensproblem nicht mitzusprechen hätte" Mauthner

"... that Bunge was not entitled to teach physiology, and therefore he was not allowed to give opinions on the problem of life"
or
"... and therefore he didn't have anything to add to the issue of life"

?

Many thanks!
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    "... that Bunge was not entitled to teach physiology, and therefore he was not allowed to give opinions on the problem of life"
    That I like. But to avoid being too direct, I'd eliminate 'allowed' (the original has no explicit dürfen either, only an implied one) , e.g.:
    "...and therefore he was in no position to give opinions on the problem of life"

    ...or maybe if you want to bring out the Konjunktiv a bit better
    "... that Bunge was not entitled to teach physiology, and therefore he wouldn't be in a position to give opinions on the problem of life"
    Not sure...better scrap that! Simple past sounds actually better in English.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    manfy's suggestions are excellent.
    I would like to propose the following alternative, in which 'entitled' has moved to a different position:
    ''..that Bunge had received no teaching assignment for physiology and consequently was not entitled to express opinions on the problem of life.''
     

    Löwenfrau

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Yes, it's perfect, thanks to you both.

    Only one word on bm's suggestion. The usage of "entitled" in Portuguese is a bit different, smthg like: "He didn't possess any title to teach physiology, and therefore ..." So, maybe your phrase could sound redundant.
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    The Latin term is "venia legendi".

    The habilitation is awarded after a public lecture, to be held after the thesis has been accepted, and after which the pro venia legendi (Latin: [petition] "for permission to read", i.e. to lecture) is bestowed. In some areas, such as law, philosophy, theology and sociology, the venia, and thus the habilitation, is only given for certain sub-fields (such as criminal law, civil law, or philosophy of science, practical philosophy etc.); in others, for the entire field.
    ...
    Once the thesis (Habilitationsschrift) and all other requirements are completed, the habilitated candidate (called Habilitand in German) officially receives the venia legendi, Latin for "permission for lecturing," or the ius docendi, "right of teaching" a specific academic subject at universities for a lifetime.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, "Lehrauftrag" is not necessarily connected to a title, it is an assignment to teach something.
    Mostly it is connected to a title (e.g. Professor).

    ''..that Bunge had received no teaching assignment for physiology and consequently was not in a position to express opinions on the problem of life.''

    The internal meaning is that he should keep quiet. It is like when my father said when I was a child: When adult people speak to each other, you have to shut up/keep your mouth.

    It shows disrespect for people when they are outsiders and have their knowledge from somewhere else.
     

    Löwenfrau

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I see. But "to be entitled" would not be a problem, correct? To be "entitled" doesn't necessarily mean that one possess a title. Anyway, that doesn't work in Portuguese. I'm considering "to be qualified".
     
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