Niezapominający syn

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  • vodevilja

    Member
    Poland, Polish/French
    Dla drogiego
    Ojczulka
    Niezapominający
    Syn

    Ojczulek is a strong (then: very intimate, now: sometimes slightly ironic) diminutive of father (ojciec). It may also have a slight connotation of advanced age. Yet I wouldn't translate it to daddy - it would have the same meaning, but wouldn't be appropriate for those times.

    For my dear
    Father
    The-not-forgetting [translated literally, as the Polish word sounds archaic]
    Son
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    FWIW, regardless of what it should read like today; I think the sentiment on the photograph reads:
    Dla drogiego ojczulga niezapominający syn.

    Tom
     

    vodevilja

    Member
    Poland, Polish/French
    Then compare this "k" with the two "g" in "drogiego". To make a "g", the writer made a loop from the right to the left, and then came down with just a small curve (just like I do, by the way) - do you see any of this in "ojczulka"? Besides, writing "ojczulga" wouldn't have any sense if you take into consideration the Polish grammar - even the ancient one. Therefore it is written just like it would be now.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I know it wouldn't have any sense, at least today, since I don't know well enough Old Polish grammar. Anyway, to my eyes it doesn't look like a k it is more reminiscent of g, which compared to the ones in drogiego is in fact a bit got out of shape. It kind of looks like there was too much ink which blurred the distincitve traits of a loop--this is also visible in j in ojczulka and niezapomniający as well as in y in the latter.

    Tom
     

    vodevilja

    Member
    Poland, Polish/French
    I'm talking about the loop in the center part of the letter, as the first part of the letter that's written - it doesn't exist in j and y. As for the height of the letter - the lack of the "upper column" can be explained by the habit of writing in cyryllic (where the k is smaller), while the "tail"... I don't know where it came from, but it can't really be anything else than an unexplainable "tail" of the letter k ;) He probably made it by mistake :]
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The Polish grammar notwithstanding, I would go for "ojczulga" together with Tom (to me, it doesn't look like "k" at all). I assume that the person who penned this word must have distorted its spelling affectionately, I'd even say deliberately. So I truly doubt there is the "k", it may resemble "y", however, then it wouldn't make any sense whatsoever. Look at the style in which this message was written, "niezapominający" isn't a very common word I think, at least nowadays, one would probably use "zawsze pamiętający" instead. That's my opinion. Uh, I fear we're somewhat getting beyond the scope of this thread, since the answer was given in #2. :D
     

    vodevilja

    Member
    Poland, Polish/French
    And for me it looks like a k, as I know people who make even stranger distortions (the writer simply didn't "reattach" the upper hook and lenghtened the lower one by accident). Just look at the g's in the first line - they are begun with an obvious counterwise loop, then followed by a curve before the second loop. It has absolutely nothing to do with the letter below.

    While the use of niezapominający doesn't have much in common for me, as it sounds quite natural if you think of the language spoken 90 years ago...
     
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