nimble fingers

Allegromoderato2

Senior Member
Portuguese
"A violinist has to keep practicing to get manual dexterity, and therefore to have nimble fingers."
I as a violinist thought this phrase. Does it sound natural? Is it correct?

Is it better?

"A violinist has to keep practicing to improve their manual dexterity, and therefore to have nimble fingers."
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, that’s better. (I was in the process of writing a post suggesting maintain rather than get.)

    But a violinist already has nimble fingers. So I would suggest “… and therefore (or thereby) to keep their fingers nimble”.

    The only problem then is that you’ve effectively said the same thing twice, since manual dexterity and nimble fingers are synonymous. :)
     

    Allegromoderato2

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Yes, that’s better. (I was in the process of writing a post suggesting maintain rather than get.)

    But a violinist already has nimble fingers. So I would suggest “… and therefore (or thereby) to keep their fingers nimble”.

    The only problem then is that you’ve effectively said the same thing twice, since manual dexterity and nimble fingers are synonymous. :)
    I was wanting to write a phrase containing both ways to express it.
    What about: "A violinist has to keep practicing to improve their manual dexterity. In other words, to have nimble fingers"?
    Thanks.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’m not comfortable with the plural “their” meaning the singular “his/her”. I would therefore probably avoid that use.

    Violinists have to keep practicing in order to improve their manual dexterity and [thus] keep their fingers nimble.
     
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