ningún cristiano creería eso

goosesounds

Senior Member
Mexican Spanish
Hello!

how would you translate "ningún cristiano creería eso" ?

there's no context, it's just a short answer to somebody
 
  • laraluca

    Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I would like to add that in South America or at least in my country Uruguay "ningún cristiano creería eso" is a fixed expression which means "nobody would believe that". When we use "cristiano" we mean anybody. I don't know if in English it gives the same idea.

    What I'm trying to say, is that you should not assume that the phrase refers to a "christian" person in a literal way.

    I don't know if I was clear.

    All the best!
     

    Lebasi

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    I would like to add that in South America or at least in my country Uruguay "ningún cristiano creería eso" is a fixed expression which means "nobody would believe that". When we use "cristiano" we mean anybody. I don't know if in English it gives the same idea.

    What I'm trying to say, is that you should not assume that the phrase refers to a "christian" person in a literal way.

    I don't know if I was clear.

    All the best!

    That makes a lot of sense. I had never heard that expression before and without much context, I thought it referred to Christians exclusively. Thank you for your input!:)
     

    Roberto_Mendoza

    Senior Member
    Spanish - México
    I would like to add that in South America or at least in my country Uruguay "ningún cristiano creería eso" is a fixed expression which means "nobody would believe that". When we use "cristiano" we mean anybody. I don't know if in English it gives the same idea.

    What I'm trying to say, is that you should not assume that the phrase refers to a "christian" person in a literal way.

    I don't know if I was clear.

    All the best!

    I completely agree. An appropriate translation would not include the word "Christian". I think that a closer option would be something like "no sane person would believe that". Cheers.
     

    GringoJJJ

    New Member
    English
    I am studying Spanish, and I do not understand this expression. I see that it can be translated as 'no sane person would believe that.' Does it imply that non-cristians are insane????
     

    Juan Jacob Vilalta

    Banned
    Español/Francés
    I am studying Spanish, and I do not understand this expression. I see that it can be translated as 'no sane person would believe that.' Does it imply that non-cristians are insane????

    No.
    It simply means anybody.
    Antes, se suponía que todo el mundo era cristiano.

    ¡Oye, cuidado con esa pistola, no vayas a matar a un cristiano!

    Oye, es el diputado xxx, no es cualquier cristiano.

    Cristiano por anybody es bastante común, todavía en México.
     

    GringoJJJ

    New Member
    English
    Thank you for your explanation. Do you think that Spanish-speakers who are not Christians find the expression offensive?
     

    Roberto_Mendoza

    Senior Member
    Spanish - México
    I am studying Spanish, and I do not understand this expression. I see that it can be translated as 'no sane person would believe that.' Does it imply that non-cristians are insane????

    No, not exactly. Most expressions that say "cristiano" ("como buen cristiano", "se murieron 10 cristianos", etc.) are idiomatic phrases that derive from the time when Spain and its colonies (in the Americas and elsewhere) were exclusively Catholic. Moreover, if you go back and look at Spanish history, you will realize that this "us (Christians) vs. them (non-Christians)" division is partly due to the 700-plus years of occupation of the Spanish peninsula by the Moors, with the resulting struggle. You could fill two or three libraries with all the books that have been written about this topic (the cultural traits that resulted from the Moorish invasion of Spain). Nowadays they are just idiomatic phrases, and I don't think that anyone would mean to exclude non-Christians.

    But to put things in perspective, I believe that a similar expression in English might be "red-blooded American" (or pick your country or group of choice). Although it's slightly different, it has similar connotations in that it sets some sort of standard or against which to define a person. I am not sure if that phrase is used much, or if its meaning has evolved to mean "any one person", but I get the impression that it's similar. I might be wrong though. Wait to see other responses. Cheers.
     

    srta chicken

    Senior Member
    US English
    For what it's worth: a friend of mine who is Mexican once told me that "cristiano" was used in colonial times to mean "Spaniard"(Catholic), and was used to exclude native americans (pagans).
     

    Duometri

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    For what it's worth: a friend of mine who is Mexican once told me that "cristiano" was used in colonial times to mean "Spaniard"(Catholic), and was used to exclude native americans (pagans).

    That's wrong. Most indians were Chistian too. I think that meaning is propaganda from the times of independence. As it has been said, Christian means man.
     

    BrooklynBoy

    Senior Member
    English - Nueva York
    I'm sure that most Spanish speakers don't use this expression with any racist, anti-Muslim or other bad intent. However, objectively, one has to admit that equating "christian" with "human" is inherently derrogatory toward non-christians.

    An equivalent expression in English would be "that's very white of you", which means "that was a good thing you just did or said". I'm sure many have used this expression with no conscious racist intent, but it is a racist expression nonetheless.
     

    GringoJJJ

    New Member
    English
    I'm sure that most Spanish speakers don't use this expression with any racist, anti-Muslim or other bad intent. However, objectively, one has to admit that equating "christian" with "human" is inherently derrogatory toward non-christians.

    An equivalent expression in English would be "that's very white of you", which means "that was a good thing you just did or said". I'm sure many have used this expression with no conscious racist intent, but it is a racist expression nonetheless.

    I see your point. However the meaning of that is very/mighty white of you has evolved. It no longer means that white people are more virtuous than everyone else. It is now used sarcastically in reference to underwhelming acts of generosity. It is now a derogatory statement towards Caucasians.

    It seems from what our Spanish speakers have said, that cristiano is still commonly used to mean everyone[/]. I wonder if this is country-specific. I work with a woman from Panama and she was unfamiliar with the expression. I also asked a friend from Catalunya, and he did not know the expression. Perhaps other foreros could share if it is used in their countries. I would hate to use the expression in the wrong environment. Thank you all for your help!:confused:
     

    BrooklynBoy

    Senior Member
    English - Nueva York
    I see your point. However the meaning of that is very/mighty white of you has evolved. It no longer means that white people are more virtuous than everyone else. It is now used sarcastically in reference to underwhelming acts of generosity. It is now a derogatory statement towards Caucasians.

    It seems from what our Spanish speakers have said, that cristiano is still commonly used to mean everyone[/]. I wonder if this is country-specific. I work with a woman from Panama and she was unfamiliar with the expression. I also asked a friend from Catalunya, and he did not know the expression. Perhaps other foreros could share if it is used in their countries. I would hate to use the expression in the wrong environment. Thank you all for your help!:confused:


    True, some people use "white of you" in a sarcastic way, but this just further shows the inherent racism of the phrase itself. Similarly, with "cristiano", I would strongly urge you and others not to use this phrase in Spanish since it will, intentionally or not, be promoting negative ideas about non-christians. Can there be any doubt that Spaniards used it to denigrate Muslims, and Mexicans used it to denigrate Indians? The problem, perhaps, is that many christians, and many whites, take it for granted, without even thinking about it, that christians are good, or that whites are superior. Thus they use these phrases without considering their real content.
     

    Duometri

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    It is commonly used in Spain today. It has never had a racist meaning, and it was not used to denigrate anybody. Since it was taken for granted that everybody was Christian in Spain, it just meant "everybody", with no further connotation. It was NEVER used to mean: "ningún cristiano haría esto, pero los no cristianos, que son inferiores, sí lo harían"
     

    goosesounds

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    I would like to add that in South America or at least in my country Uruguay "ningún cristiano creería eso" is a fixed expression which means "nobody would believe that". When we use "cristiano" we mean anybody. I don't know if in English it gives the same idea.

    What I'm trying to say, is that you should not assume that the phrase refers to a "christian" person in a literal way.

    I don't know if I was clear.

    All the best!

    no no...
    the idea was to talk about christians... believers in Christ...
    I know in some countries in latin america they say "christian" refering to anybody, but this time, is wasn't the idea. Thanks... and at least in mexico, is not very common... I actually think it's a little bit strange and rarely used...
     
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