nip and tux, nip/tux

Marcin_Bielecki

New Member
Polish
Hello everybody.

What does "nip/tux" mean in the following context? It is a blog entry, but being a new user I am not allowed to provide link as context, so I quote directly (as much as I dare; there are two more sentences). The "nip/tux" part is the title of the entry.

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nip/tux


today, in the depth of my boredom, i tried on my tuxedo from last year in anticipation of this saturday's GSU summer ball. it will be only the second time ever that i wear the suit out, as i originally had it bought for me for last year's leavers prom. and let me say, not only had i forgotten how much i love wearing a tuxedo that is well cut, i had forgotten how well cut the suit was in the first place. the trousers were a bit loose, but i suspect that may be something to do with me not wearing any shoes when i put them on.

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Beats me. Any help will be appreciated.
The blog is "Weeks, Pictures, Days, Words" by Joshua Kirk.

MB
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "A nip and tuck" is a euphemism for plastic surgery (having your appearance altered through surgery). "Nip/Tuck" is a TV show about plastic surgeons. Tux short for tuxedo sounds like "tucks" so "nip/tux" becomes a play on words about having your tuxedo altered.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The phrase 'nips and tucks' does refer to plastic surgery but I think the origin is terms from dressmaking and clothes altering techiques which make the clothes fit better by making them smaller.

    :)
    Hermie
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Nip and tuck "a close thing" is recorded from 1832, perhaps from sailing or tailoring.
    I don't know what "a close thing" means, and I am talking about modern terms used in fitting and altering clothes, dressmaking and tailoring, " modern" meaning in the 60's, 70's and 80's thro the early '90's. I haven't done any dressmaking since 1995.To me, to 'nip' or rather "nip it in" means to cut off excess fabric, and to 'tuck' or "take a tuck in it" means to fold in excess fabric. There's the phrase "a nipped-in waist" meaning shaped into the waist.

    :)
    Hermie
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I agree that the plastic surgery meaning is from Hermione's sewing metaphor since plastic surgery involves cutting bits off and stitching back together in exactly the same way.
    I'm familiar with the "The race was close - the leaders were nip and tuck at the end." Perhaps in this sense a nip and a tuck is a minor unnoticeable adjustment? I don't know enough about nautical terminology to guess how it's related to sailing.
     
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