no better university for my interests than one <whose/ that's/ which> name is attributed

emilycat27

New Member
English - United States
I am writing one of my college application supplements and I have come across a question. This the sentence that I will be referring to:

There can therefore be no better university for my interests than one ______ name is attributed to sequencing the human genome.

When I read it aloud, it seems as if the word "whose" should fill the blank, but I feel as if it would be wrong, given that it is referring to "university". My mother suggested that perhaps the correct word would be "that's", but it doesn't seem quite right. I don't want to use "which" because it would require changing my syntax to something like "...than one with a name to which sequencing human genome is attributed."

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    There is no genitive of "that" in modern English (and "that's" is not an option); however, "whose" is used for "that" and "which". Some people may object to it, or at least recommend avoidance where possible: I would say that it is not possible to avoid it and improve your sentence at the same time. In any case, I have no real problem with "whose" used in respect to inanimates, and if there is a problem, it is ameliorated by the fact that a college is made up of people (college originally meant an association of colleagues).

    There is a discussion on this issue here (and there may be others).
     

    emilycat27

    New Member
    English - United States
    Thank you both very much. I feel that my confusion may have arisen from the fact that, although everything technically has a name, one does not too often refer to a name as a possession of an object.
     
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