no caerle bien a alguien / no caer bien algo

NewdestinyX

Senior Member
American English
I was wondering if the idiom 'no caerle bien a alguien' can drop the dative pronoun and still carry the notion of not liking but rather a more passive/impersonal sense --> 'some thing not 'being liked'' by no specific named person.

So if:
Pedro no le cae bien a mi padre = My father dodesn't like Pedro (much). (natural English)

Can this be said:
No cayeron bien las nuevas reglas = The new rules weren't received well (weren't well liked).

The basic question being -- can the 'not liking' meaning carry through without the dative pronoun present?

Thanks in advance,
Grant
 
  • Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Hi,
    You can hear that as in the news as in colloquial speech. It's quite common. I mean, you are completely right. If you drop the pronoun, then the sense gets general and even impersonal, it's just like not indicating any particular indriect object.

    Even food can "no caer bien", meaning one gets sick: Los fríjoles trasnochados no caen bien [al estómago]. Por lo menos no le caen bien al mío.

    Regards ;)
     

    NewdestinyX

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,
    You can hear that as in the news as in colloquial speech. It's quite common. I mean, you are completely right. If you drop the pronoun, then the sense gets general and even impersonal.
    Regards ;)
    Thanks Milton. As I get more fluent -- these things are just getting more 'logical' to me in my '2nd language'. It just 'seemed to work'. I like this phase of my acquiring Spanish. Thanks for your help.

    Grant
     

    NewdestinyX

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm green with envy. Please, notice some additional comments in my previous post.
    Regards ;)
    Ah interesting. That's a little harder to translate to English with the 'same kinds of words' -- but I'm finding that's more the case as I learn more Spanish.. You have to leave your 1st language behind totally.

    In English the translation would be roughly: The frijoles didn't sit well with me./The frijoles upset my stomach.

    And you have nothing to be envious of as your English is nearly perfect, Milton. :thumbsup: :)

    Thanks, again,
    Grant
     

    El intérprete

    Senior Member
    US
    US English
    Hi,
    You can may hear that as in both the news and in colloquial speech. It's quite common. I mean, you are completely right. If you drop the pronoun, then the sense gets is general and even impersonal,. it's It's just like not indicating any particular indirect object.

    Even food can "no caer bien", meaning one gets sick: Los fríjoles trasnochados no caen bien [al estómago]. Por lo menos no le caen bien al mío.

    Regards ;)
    Hola Milton Sand:
    Te hice unas correcciones estilísticas para que tus oraciones fluyeran mejores. Volviendo al tema original, ¿dirías que "Las nuevas reglas no cayeron bien." es igual a "Las nuevas reglas no fueron bien recibidas." No estoy familiarizado con este uso de "caer bien". Gracias por molestarte en ayudarme.
     

    NewdestinyX

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hola Milton Sand:
    Te hice unas correcciones estilísticas para que tus oraciones fluyeran mejores. Volviendo al tema original, ¿dirías que "Las nuevas reglas no cayeron bien." es igual a "Las nuevas reglas no fueron bien recibidas." No estoy familiarizado con este uso de "caer bien". Gracias por molestarte en ayudarme.
    Actually El Interp, it's pretty impossible to get along well in Spanish without the expression 'caerle bien'; especially when you're distinguishing between 'liking/loving/being physically attracted to'. That's one of the first times a student of Spanish can get into trouble. :eek:

    You can't ever use 'gustar' to transmit 'liking a person, as a friend' because 'gustar' always carries a 'pysical attraction' connotation when referring to people. So the 'main' way the Spanish native speaker transmits 'liking someone' (or not liking them) where physical attraction is not the issue is thru 'caerle bien', 'no caerle bien' or 'caerle mal'.

    Now caerle bien can be used synonymously with 'gustar' when referring to things being liked. With foods 'caer bien' is a little different than gustar in that, as Milton pointed out, caer bien would refer to how your stomach felt after eating.

    So:
    Me gustan las ideas = Me caen bien las ideas.

    But:
    "Me gusta Ana."/"Ana me gusta" is 'very different' from "Ana me cae bien."

    I learned that difference the hard way.. and was very embarrassed. :)

    Grant
     
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    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Hi,
    In short, I would say the basic expression is "caer bien [ormal]" and it means kind of "to be assimilated/received well [or badly]". So, it covers from "to be agreeable" —regarding perception or opinion, psycho-social assimilation— to "to do good" —things one's body gets, somatic or organic assimilation—.

    Tu hermana me cae bien . = I like your sister. <—"Gustar" might mean a sexual attraction.
    Su cambio de opinión nos cae muy bien. = We like a lot his change of mind.
    Te caería bien un duchazo. = Taking a shower would make you feel better.

    Regards ;)
     

    Helice

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    A british man told me our "caer bien" is "come across". Esto es hablando en terminos de una persona. La comida "sienta bien".

    Ana me cae bien. = Ana come across to me very good.

    Sorry i'm not sure how are writed "come across".

    EDITO

    Acabo de leer en las normas que un solo post por hilo. Espero que "El intérprete" llegue a ver aquí que le agradezco su respuesta y corrección. Estoy alucinando de lo maja que es por aquí la gente.

    El interprete said:
    Se puede decir en inglés "Ana comes across as a very kind person." pero significa "Ana de la impresión de ser una persona muy amable."

    No es exáctamente igual que "Ana me cae bien." pero creo que "to come across" suena bien si es usado como te he mostrado.
     
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    susantash

    Senior Member
    Español de Uruguay
    Hola, NewdestinyX.
    A Mí me sonaba perfectamente posible que algo "no cayera bien" en el sentido de no causar una buena impresión, aunque no estaba del todo segura. A veces de tanto decirlo te llega a sonar bien cualquier cosa!:D
    Hice una pequeña búsqueda en Google y encontré 2600 páginas con "no cayeron bien", así que es perfectamente posible y natural.
    Saludos!
     

    NewdestinyX

    Senior Member
    American English
    Is that about "to come across" = "caer bien" correct?
    ;)
    Like many idiomatic expressions (modísmos) it seems like 'caer bien' has a lot of uses and can transmit several things that are different but related concepts in both English and Spanish.

    In the majority of ways Spanish uses 'caerle bien' -- the verb 'like' is the best translation to English.

    When Spanish uses 'caer bien algo' (sin CI) then English would use 'to be received well'. 'To come accross' would only be used if something 'mental' is being expressed.

    No cayeron bien sus ideas. = His ideas didn't come across well/weren't well received.

    The more I think about it, Milton, I think 'come across well' and 'be received well' are pretty much synonymous in English.

    Grant
     

    El intérprete

    Senior Member
    US
    US English
    A British man told me our "caer bien" is "come across". Esto es hablando en términos de una persona. La comida "sienta bien".

    Ana me cae bien. = Ana come across to me very good.

    Sorry I'm not sure how are writed to write "come across". O, también, Sorry I'm not sure how "come across" is written.
    Se puede decir en inglés "Ana comes across as a very kind person." pero significa "Ana de la impresión de ser una persona muy amable."

    No es exactamente igual que "Ana me cae bien." pero creo que "to come across" suena bien si es usado como te he mostrado.
     
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