No country ever has – or surely will – match the Chinese...

  • marget

    Senior Member
    Hello.

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/3bcd284e-6573-11dd-a352-0000779fd18c.html
    No country ever has – or surely will – match the Chinese in the effort, human power, synchronicity, ingenuity and, it has to be said, money they were willing to put into what was once a little show to start a big sporting event. Now it is an enormous show and a gigantic event.

    Why "match", not "matched"?
    The sentence seems awkward and poorly written to me. "No country has matched" is definitely correct.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    You are right. What the author has done is to take the "will" from the parenthetical remark (in dashes) and used that to govern the tense of match. This is incorrect, as a parenthetical remark cannot effect the tense of the verb in the main sentence. In other words the sentence must still be correct when the remark is removed. This is clearly not the case:

    No country ever has match the Chinese in the effort... :cross:

    However, to correct "match" would sound somewhat awkward, unless it is put something like this:

    No country ever has matched – or surely will match – the Chinese in the effort...
     
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