no es moco de pavo

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jolugega

Senior Member
spanish, spain
Hola a todos. Soy nuevo en estos foros y los encuentro fascinantes y de gran altura lingüística.
Tengo una duda (bueno, tengo muchas,pero iré poco a poco):
¿Cómo se diría en inglés que algo "no es moco de pavo"?
Gracias.
 
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  • aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Otro de ambiente rústico, habland de dinero: That ain't chicken feed.
    En respuesta a algo que alguien te acaba de decir: You ain't just a-whistling 'Dixie'
     

    pbasil

    Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Cbes, this story above is a funny joke.
    The actual origin however is coming from pickpocketing.

    "Moco de pavo" refers to the fleshy appendix a turkey has over the beak. Pavo means turkey.
    However it seems that this saying originated from the language of rogues and thieves.
    Long back when gentlemen used to wear pocket watches, in the pickpocket jargon "moco" was the chain (usually of little value) hanging from the "pavo" (jargon for victim), after the the watch was stolen.


    "No es moco de pavo" means it is NOT "something unimportant" like the chain (of no value).

    Therefore today this expression is used to highlight the relevance and quality of something that was not given much importance.
     

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    Si se refiere a la dificultad, otras traducciones serían:

    It's not child's play, you know?
    It's not as easy as it looks/sounds.
    It's not exactly a walk in the park.
     

    Raist101

    Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Si se refiere a la dificultad, otras traducciones serían:

    It's not child's play, you know?
    It's not as easy as it looks/sounds.
    It's not exactly a walk in the park.
    It refers more to the importance. Not something that should be easily disregarded.
     

    erichio

    New Member
    English - USA
    I know this is an old thread, but unfortunately I have to disagree with most of the suggestions for English equivalents to "no es moco de pavo." To me, the best options in most contexts (in terms of meaning and usage frequency) would be "It's a pretty big deal" or "It's no small deal." Admittedly, it lacks the idiomatic force of the Spanish equivalent, though I can say with relative certainty that it is the most frequent option (at least in the US).

    Nonetheless, if an idiomatic translation is a must, the most decent-sounding of the above posters to me is "It's no small potatoes," though even that option is not all that widely-used (It is still a very good option, though, and I think it would be widely understood, just perhaps not nearly as frequently-heard as the Spanish expression in question). Of the others, "Not to be sniffed at/Not to be sneezed at" also sounds acceptable to me, though it isn't perfect and I don't remember hearing it in at least the past 10 years (I believe the only time I ever heard it was while reading short chapter books as a kid, most of which were written in the 80s-90s at the latest and featured unrealistic dialogue that was presumably written by an adult of the previous generation).

    The others (such as "that ain't hay") mostly sound super colloquial and/or region-specific (such as the south), and most of them are ones I can safely say I have never heard.
     

    Rodal

    Banned
    Castellano (Chile)
    Moco de pavo es "poca cosa"; "no es moco de pavo" es "it's not insignificant".
     
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    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    May I add that this 'moco' does not mean snot, as someone thought above. It refers to the turkey's red fleshy bit that falls over its bill.
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    "Moco de pavo" refers to the fleshy appendix a turkey has over the beak.
    Thanks for setting me straight, pbasil.
    May I add that this 'moco' does not mean snot, as someone thought above. It refers to the turkey's red fleshy bit that falls over its bill.
    It turns out that the English word for that is "snood".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snood_(anatomy)
    In anatomical terms, the snood is an erectile, fleshy protuberance on the forehead of turkeys. Most of the time when the turkey is in a relaxed state, the snood is pale and 2-3 cm long. However, when the male begins strutting (the courtship display), the snood engorges with blood, becomes redder and elongates several centimetres, hanging well below the beak
     
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    Rodal

    Banned
    Castellano (Chile)
    Creo que estamos confundiendo el signficado literal con el significado idiomático que tiene la expresión "moco de pavo"
    Por mucho que signifique "snood" en su contexto literal, en español la expresión "moco de pavo" significa "poca cosa".
    Debiéramos enfocarnos más en conocer las expresiones idiomáticas que signifiquen lo mismo en inglés. " mañana tengo un examen de fisica cuantica... NO es moco de pavo!"
     
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    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Creo que estamos confundiendo el signficado literal con el significado idiomático que tiene la expresión "moco de pavo"
    Por mucho que signifique "snood" en su contexto literal, en español la expresión "moco de pavo" significa "poca cosa".
    Debiéramos enfocarnos más en conocer las expresiones idiomáticas que signifiquen lo mismo en inglés.
    No veo la confusión. Me parece de utilidad para el foro que conste también el significado literal, tanto en español como en inglés. No se puede descartar que algún día lo busque algún avicultor, por ejemplo.
     

    Rodal

    Banned
    Castellano (Chile)
    No veo la confusión. Me parece de utilidad para el foro que conste también el significado literal, tanto en español como en inglés. No se puede descartar que algún día lo busque algún avicultor, por ejemplo.
    Entonces tu dirías "it was no snood" to say it' was not a piece of cake?
     
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