No hay quien + subjuntivo

Philippa

Senior Member
Britain - English
¡Buenos días, foreros!
Esto es el comienzo de mi lucha con (¡y contra!) el subjuntivo....
Se trata de un ejercicio, pero no entiendo lo que significan las oraciones. ¿Podríais traducirlas para mí, por favor?
No hay quien te quiera.
No hay quien te entienda.
No hay quien sepa qué vas a hacer.
No hay quien te pueda comprender.

Está en este vínculo, número 3:
http://mld.ursinus.edu/~jarana/Ejercicios/self-check/subj6.html
Muchas gracias de antemano
Philippa :)
 
  • ceirun

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    Hi Philippa:

    There is no one who loves you (No one loves you)
    There is no one who understands you (No one understands you)
    There is no one who knows what you are going to do (No one knows what you're going to do)
    There is no one who can understand you (No one can understand you)

    Another similar example could be the title of the Gabriel García Márquez book: "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" - "No one writes to the Colonel".
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Philippa said:
    ¡Buenos días, foreros!
    Esto es el comienzo de mi lucha con (¡y contra!) el subjuntivo....
    Se trata de un ejercicio, pero no entiendo lo que significan las oraciones. ¿Podríais traducirlas para mí, por favor?
    No hay quien te quiera.
    No hay quien te entienda.
    No hay quien sepa qué vas a hacer.
    No hay quien te pueda comprender.

    Está en este vínculo, número 3:
    http://mld.ursinus.edu/%7Ejarana/Ejercicios/self-check/subj6.html
    Muchas gracias de antemano
    Philippa :)
    ¡Hola!
    Aunque las catro frases son gramaticalmente correctas, la respuesta que te piden es "No hay quien te entienda", una frase que en español utilizamos mucho.

    "No hay quien" significa aproximadamente "It's impossible to" y va siempre seguida de subjuntivo.

    Aquí van algunos ejemplos.

    Con este ruido no hay quien duerma.
    En esta casa no hay quien estudie.
    Con este calor no hay quien pare (muy habitual en los veranos españoles).
    Siempre estás de mal humor. No hay quien te soporte.
    Cállate ya, que hoy no hay quien te aguante.

    Algunas veces se dice también "No hay cristiano que..." (o, más vulgarmente, No hay dios que...:warn: )

    Espero que te sea de ayuda.
     

    ceirun

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    lizy said:
    ¡Hola!


    "No hay quien" significa aproximadamente "It's impossible to" y va siempre seguida de subjuntivo.
    Ajá. Entonces supongo que las frases serían mejor traducidas...

    It's impossible to love you...
    It's impossible to understand you..
    etc,.
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    ceirun said:
    Hi Philippa:

    There is no one who loves you (No one loves you)
    There is no one who understands you (No one understands you)
    There is no one who knows what you are going to do (No one knows what you're going to do)
    There is no one who can understand you (No one can understand you)

    Another similar example could be the title of the Gabriel García Márquez book: "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" - "No one writes to the Colonel".
    Hi Ceirun,

    Even if your translations are literal, I don't think that "No hay quien" y "No tiene quien" are synonymous expressions. Take a look at these examples if you feel like it:

    No hay quien vaya con Juan al cine (porque habla sin parar, hace ruido, come palomitas, se levanta de la butaca...).

    Juan no tiene quien vaya con él al cine (porque sus amigos están de vacaciones, su novia ha quedado y su hermano está trabajando).

    Hope it's clear now.
    Saludos desde Madrid!
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    ceirun said:
    Ajá. Entonces supongo que las frases serían mejor traducidas...

    It's impossible to love you...
    It's impossible to understand you..
    etc,.
    Yeah, this is perfect. You got it!
    (By the way, I love the "ajá" thing!)
     

    ceirun

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    You're right Lizy (and cheers for the examples :thumbsup: ), but I didn't mean to say that those expressions were synonymous... it seems that Philippa is doing some exercises with the subjunctive, but is unsure about the "quien" + subjunctive construction (a little strange for English speakers), so I thought that would just be another example (although not exactly the same as the ones in the first post).
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    ceirun said:
    You're right Lizy (and cheers for the examples :thumbsup: ), but I didn't mean to say that those expressions were synonymous... it seems that Philippa is doing some exercises with the subjunctive, but is unsure about the "quien" + subjunctive construction (a little strange for English speakers), so I thought that would just be another example (although not exactly the same as the ones in the first post).
    :tick:

    Sorry. It was me, then. I'm not fully awake yet!
     

    Philippa

    Senior Member
    Britain - English
    Thankyou ceirun and lizy.
    It's always more complicated than I think I will be. Sigh!!

    I'm going to try to translate these:
    Con este ruido no hay quien duerma. With this noise no-one can sleep/it's impossible to sleep.
    En esta casa no hay quien estudie. It's impossible to study in this house/Nobody can study in this house.
    Con este calor no hay quien pare (muy habitual en los veranos españoles). Parar is to stay rather than stop here? It's impossible to stay in this heat/ No-one can stay in this heat.
    Siempre estás de mal humor. No hay quien te soporte. You're always in a bad mood. No-one puts up with you.
    Cállate ya, que hoy no hay quien te aguante. Shut up now?, because? today it's impossible to tolerate you (awkward English here I know...)

    Algunas veces se dice también "No hay cristiano que..." (o, más vulgarmente, No hay dios que...:warn: ) 'cristiano' or 'dios' is instead of 'quien', right?

    "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" - ceirun, you must be psychic!! :D That book title was in an exercise I tried last night. It makes a leetle bit more sense now, but what does it mean? Sort of 'No-one is able to write to the Colonel' like Juan not having anyone who can come to the cinema with him?

    Phew! You guys carried on lots, while I was typing this with two and a half fingers. Thanks again for your help!!
    Saludos from a brain-aching Philippa :eek: :)
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    So you think we're going through a fit of grammatical hyperactivity this morning, don't you? ;-)

    Philippa said:
    Thankyou ceirun and lizy.
    It's always more complicated than I think I will be. Sigh!!

    I'm going to try to translate these:
    Con este ruido no hay quien duerma. With this noise no-one can sleep/it's impossible to sleep.:tick:
    En esta casa no hay quien estudie. It's impossible to study in this house/Nobody can study in this house.:tick:
    Con este calor no hay quien pare (muy habitual en los veranos españoles). Parar is to stay rather than stop here? It's impossible to stay in this heat/ No-one can stay in this heat.:tick:
    Siempre estás de mal humor. No hay quien te soporte. You're always in a bad mood. No-one puts up with you.:tick:
    Cállate ya, que hoy no hay quien te aguante. Shut up now?, because? :tick: today it's impossible to put up with you
    Algunas veces se dice también "No hay cristiano que..." (o, más vulgarmente, No hay dios que...:warn: ) 'cristiano' or 'dios' is instead of 'quien', right?:tick:

    Phew! You guys carried on lots, while I was typing this with two and a half fingers. Thanks again for your help!!
     

    ceirun

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    Philippa said:
    "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" - ceirun, you must be psychic!! :D That book title was in an exercise I tried last night.
    Hi Philippa, there was an extract from that novel at the back of the first learning-Spanish book I had, and it confused me too when I saw that kind of sentence construction for the first time.
    Judging by those nice green ticks Lizy has just given you, it seems you must have it more or less sussed now anyway. :)
     

    Philippa

    Senior Member
    Britain - English
    ceirun said:
    Judging by those nice green ticks Lizy has just given you, it seems you must have it more or less sussed now anyway. :)
    I'd like to think so, but this is only one tiny-weeny bit of one of the chapters on the subjunctive! And it wasn't even a main difficulty, just one tricky to understand question!! Aaah!!!!
    (But, yes, I do like the green ticks!! :D :tick: )

    Lizy, what about this, please?
    "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" What does it mean? Sort of 'No-one is able to write to the Colonel' like Juan not having anyone who is able come to the cinema with him?

    Philippa :)
     

    lizy

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Philippa said:
    "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" - ceirun, you must be psychic!! :D That book title was in an exercise I tried last night. It makes a leetle bit more sense now, but what does it mean? Sort of 'No-one is able to write to the Colonel' like Juan not having anyone who can come to the cinema with him?
    I almost forgot!
    Have you read the book? It's about an old man who's been waiting a letter from the government for ages but it never arrives.
    In this case I would say "There's no-one to" rather than "No-one is able to". However, If i had to rephrase the title in Spanish my choice would be "Nadie escribe al coronel" o "Al coronel no le escribe nadie". So "No-one writes to the Colonel" is, in my opinion, the best translation. As simple as that!
     

    Philippa

    Senior Member
    Britain - English
    lizy said:
    I almost forgot!
    Have you read the book? It's about an old man who's been waiting a letter from the government for ages but it never arrives.
    In this case I would say "There's no-one to" rather than "No-one is able to". However, If i had to rephrase the title in Spanish my choice would be "Nadie escribe al coronel" o "Al coronel no le escribe nadie". So "No-one writes to the Colonel" is, in my opinion, the best translation. As simple as that!
    Thanks a million for all your help, Lizy!
    Nooo, I haven't read the book! I've only read one real (i.e. adult) book in Spanish (so far!) - Belén's my witness!! :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top