no issue=no problem?

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I heard a Singaporean say "There's no issue", "No issue" frequently, I wonder if "No problem" also means "No issue". The context is like:

If you need my help, let me know, there's no issue.
I don't have any issues helping you.

I guess it's just wrong, am I right?
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think the way in which issue can be used to approximate problem is in constructions like 'I have no issues with their using my name', similar to 'I have no quarrel with them about using my name'.

    I suppose this is sense 13 in Collins:
    the matter remaining in dispute between the parties to an action after the pleadings
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hey, Nat.

    I feel very lucky because you've finally come. Yes, I was talking to a Singaporean and he used "No issue" frequently. I remember that he repeated this phrase when we were talking about my plans, each time when he told me he was "open" and was willing to help me, namely giving me a check or any form of payment (Of course this is rediculous because we've met only twice).

    So, when he said "I have no issue", I'm pretty sure that he meant "I don't have any problem giving you a check", something like that.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Natkretep, I think you're being very generous in supposing that Silverobama's friend was familiar with Collins sense 13, which is a technical legal term. I think he's more likely to be influenced by Californian psychobabble, which states more or less "The use of the word problem arouses negative reactions in the subject; it should be avoided at all costs, and replaced by challenge or issue. Remember, dudes, there are no problems, there are only solutions!"
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Whatever it is, I don't think it is a Singaporeanism. I was thinking of how I would use it in the context of argumentation, and therefore a kind of metaphorical extension of sense 13.

    Side issue ;): Silver, you are sure your friend wasn't talking about issuing cheques? We are rather fond of talking about issuing cheques here. If not, I can't image why he couldn't have said 'I'm very happy to write you a cheque'!
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Silver, you are sure your friend wasn't talking about issuing cheques? We are rather fond of talking about issuing cheques here. If not, I can't image why he couldn't have said 'I'm very happy to write you a cheque'!
    Hi, Nat. Yes, I am pretty sure he meant "No problem", he first used "No issue" when I said something to him, I didn't recall what it was, but I'm pretty sure that the reply to what I said would be "No problem", oh, It seems to be "If one day I want to have my own studio, I'll call you".

    If he meant "issuing" a check, I think he'd say "I have no issue issuing you a check".:eek:

    He speaks very fast with a strong accent, but I am sure I heard the words clearly. :rolleyes:
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    We use "issue" all the time in this way ("no issue with" as a replacement for "no problem with") I have heard it, and I can find many examples.

    Here are a few:

    Pink Assures Followers She Has 'No Issue' with Demi Lovato: 'Look for a Feud Elsewhere' http://www.people.com/article/pink-demi-lovato-vma-comments
    Ben Rothberger has no issues with his knees during practice: http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/10/29/ben-roethlisberger-has-no-issues-with-knee-in-practice-this-week/
    NFL has no issues with Fantasy Football leagues: http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/10/08/goodell-explains-why-nfl-has-no-issues-with-daily-fantasy/
    The Tesla had no issue taking the curve at speed: http://learnbonds.com/124524/tesla-motors-inc-tsla-stealth-updates-fix-risky-robocar-issues/
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I don't think "No issue" is standard English, even though Truffla provided some links. I am not saying that Singaporean are speaking Chinglish. But in this regard, I think the man made a mistake. Maybe he memorized the meaning of that word in Chinese and combined these two language together.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    I've never heard that in the UK. I'm not in a position to know if it's considered correct in India.

    Thank you. I have a passion for "English" English, and nobody hates Indian "English" more than I. I don't consider anything correct in English even in India unless it is correct in BE or AE for that matter. However, there might be a few exceptions of Indian English words for which no synonyms exist in English.
     
    Last edited:

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I don't think this is a question of "Indian" or "British" English, but one of precise or woolly English. The more purposes you put a word to, the less useful that word becomes because its meaning gets blunted, like a sharp chisel that is used for opening paint cans.

    The word issue has several primary meanings already, (exit, offspring, consequence...) two of which are: a point on the decision of which something depends; a matter or point which remains to be decided (Shorter Oxford English Dictionary). So to say "there is no issue" means that there's nothing to talk about.

    Now, if you are going to stretch the uses of issue to mean "problem", then you confuse the discussion - should your listener understand that you're saying "That's no problem" or are you in fact telling him "There's nothing to be discussed"? The first interpretation is helpful, the second one dismissive.

    I've already said where I think this originated (see #7). If you want to perpetuate that sort of woolly thinking, go ahead. Personally, I'm of the view that you don't solve a problem by pretending it doesn't exist.
     
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