no matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly

Croque Madame

New Member
Chinese
The sentence goes like this, "No matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."

I definitely think it's incorrect. But I don't know how to correct it.

Here are two possibilities I've come up with:
"No matter it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."
"No matter whether it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."

Which one is right? Can anyone here help me?
Thank you in advance.
 
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  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Who wrote this sentence (source) and what is the intended meaning? Is it that you're going to miss these days when it is sunny, smoggy, etc., or are you going to miss these days, be they smoggy, sunny, etc.?

    For starters, I can say both the corrections suggested by you do not work...

    PS. Hey, welcome to the forum. :)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hello Croque Madame and welcome to the forum. :)

    Your second suggestion I ("No matter whether it's ...") is better, although by miss and appreciate I think you mean miss appreciating or simply miss these days.

    By the way, gonna is something that people say and should really not be used in writing.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days.
    This is grammatical, but it is not an example of formal written English, and is instead intended to represent informal elliptical speech. It means something like It does not matter to me if these days are smoggy, sunny or chilly: I am going to miss and appreciate them.
     
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    Croque Madame

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hello Croque Madame and welcome to the forum. :)

    Your second suggestion I ("No matter whether it's ...") is better, although by miss and appreciate I think you mean miss appreciating or simply miss these days.

    By the way, gonna is something that people say and should really not be used in writing.
    Thank you.
    Actually it's a sentence posted by one of my friends on her twitter. I only feel the former part of the sentence sounds weird. Do you mean that even the latter part is confusing?
    By "appreciate" she is expressing her gratitude to her experience in these days since she has learnt a lot from it.
     

    Croque Madame

    New Member
    Chinese
    This is grammatical, but it is not an example of formal written English, and is instead intended to represent informal elliptical speech. It means something like It does not matter to me if these days are smoggy, sunny or chilly: I am going to miss and appreciate them.
    Thank you for your comment, but I still feel confused.
    You say the sentence is grammatical. But isn't it that the subject of the former part of the sentence is the "whether" and that of the latter part is "I"?
    Besides, I thought that "no matter" could only be used as "no matter what/how/where..."

    If this sentence is informal and elliptical, how to make it formal and complete? How about the 2 suggestions I made?
     

    Croque Madame

    New Member
    Chinese
    Who wrote this sentence (source) and what is the intended meaning? Is it that you're going to miss these days when it is sunny, smoggy, etc., or are you going to miss these days, be they smoggy, sunny, etc.?

    For starters, I can say both the corrections suggested by you do not work...

    PS. Hey, welcome to the forum. :)
    Thank you very much.
    Actually it's a sentence posted by one of my friends on her Twitter. What she wants to say is that no matter what the weather is like these days, smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, she will always remember and feel thankful to things that happened in these days.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    The sentence goes like this, "No matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."

    I definitely think it's incorrect. But I don't know how to correct it.

    Here are two possibilities I've come up with:
    "No matter it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."
    "No matter whether it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."

    Which one is right? Can anyone here help me?
    Thank you in advance.
    I think no matter needs to be followed by some sort of noun phrase:

    No matter it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days.:cross:
    No matter the weather— smoggy, sunny, windy, or chilly— I appreciate and am going to miss these days.:tick:

    A whether clause can be a kind of noun phrase, but whether in this context can be adverbial, so that with whether you can omit no matter:

    No matter whether it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days.:cross:
    Whether they be smoggy, sunny, windy, or chilly, I am going to miss these days.:tick:
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You say the sentence is grammatical.
    Maybe it would be better to say that it is idiomatic rather than grammatical.
    I think no matter needs to be followed by some sort of noun phrase
    I don't see why - the items after no matter are not the subject or object of any verb. I admit, though, that no matter is usually followed by a noun phrase - either a noun or a phrase beginning that, what, how and so on.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Maybe it would be better to say that it is idiomatic rather than grammatical.
    I don't see why - the items after no matter are not the subject or object of any verb. I admit, though, that no matter is usually followed by a noun phrase - either a noun or a phrase beginning that, what, how and so on.
    I have not researched the history of "no matter" phrases/clauses, but it looks to me we have an absolute construction with "no matter" acting like "said" in "that said" or like "given" in "given this weather". What follows names something that is no matter, i.e. something that does not matter.

    "No matter" may also be used as a phrase by itself meaning "(That) doesn't matter", "(There's) no cause for worry", or "(You've) no need to worry": "Rain, snow, gloom of night? No matter."

    Do you know of an idiomatic example of "no matter" used any way other than with a noun phrase or by itself as an elliptical clause.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Examples with adjectives are easy to find:
    It's the little things, no matter good or bad, that create life: http://rachelsfusion.com/2013/11/08/its-the-little-things-no-matter-good-or-bad-that-create-life/
    No matter rich or poor, the one thing you always have to give away is love: https://www.facebook.com/positiveatmosphere/posts/10152533384153298
    The exercise for business no matter high-tech or low-tech is the same: http://www.examiner.com/article/the-exercise-for-business-no-matter-high-tech-or-low-tech-is-the-same
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Examples with adjectives are easy to find:
    It's the little things, no matter good or bad, that create life: http://rachelsfusion.com/2013/11/08/its-the-little-things-no-matter-good-or-bad-that-create-life/
    No matter rich or poor, the one thing you always have to give away is love: https://www.facebook.com/positiveatmosphere/posts/10152533384153298
    The exercise for business no matter high-tech or low-tech is the same: http://www.examiner.com/article/the-exercise-for-business-no-matter-high-tech-or-low-tech-is-the-same
    Good examples! And they sound right enough to me.

    Following these as a model, I get: "I'm going to miss these days, no matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly." I can accept this version, but the ones in the original post seem "off". I will venture to say the "no matter list-of-adjective-phrases" part needs to be near a noun or pronoun the adjectives can modify. I would call the introductory "no matter" phrase a misplaced modifier in "No matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm going to miss these days." Understandable, but not smooth reading.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I entirely agree with Forero. The no-matter phrase in the original example dangles loose or tends to attach itself to the main clause's subject 'I'. Which is wrong either way... or at least imperfect :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The sentence goes like this, "No matter smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."

    I definitely think it's incorrect. But I don't know how to correct it.

    Here are two possibilities I've come up with:
    "No matter it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."
    "No matter whether it's smoggy, sunny, windy or chilly, I'm gonna miss and appreciate these days."
    Welcome to the forum. :) And Happy New Year!
    Aside from the fact that (as others have said) "gonna" should be going to:
    Your first possibility would be correct with "if" after "matter". Your second possibility is correct. A third possibility would be using the word "how": "No matter how smoggy, sunny, . . . ".
     
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