no matter what (happens)

vost

Senior Member
France, Français
As far as I understand the WR dictionnary, happens is optional in this expression.
But how much is it optional? Is it always optional? Maybe only in colloquial/spoken language?
 
  • Delamedialuna

    New Member
    English - USA
    At least in American English "No matter what" is more common. Saying "no matter what happens" carries a little more gravity, like something terrible could actually happen.

    In a very academic setting an entirely different construction might be more appropriate. In this case, the adjective "irregardless" could be a good alternative.
    Hope that helps.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    At least in American English "No matter what" is more common. Saying "no matter what happens" carries a little more gravity, like something terrible could actually happen.

    In a very academic setting an entirely different construction might be more appropriate. In this case, the adjective "irregardless" could be a good alternative.
    Hope that helps.
    "Irregardless," though a "real word," is often considered to be grammatically incorrect. I, in fact, cringe whenever I hear it; many people will judge as being incorrect and it is far from being accepted in speech, much less in writing.

    Regardless and "irrespective of..." would be alternatives better suited to more formal contexts.
     

    AmericanCop1

    New Member
    English - US
    I never hear people say "No matter what happens !". In the US most people use No matter what.

    I mean, you don't say like.. "I'm going to get you, no matter what happens !" you say "I'm going to get you, no matter what !"

    So.. No matter what.
     
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