...no matter what the information storage resources available...

Makel Leki

Member
Russian
From The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language:
The importance of the fact that English sentences can be constructed to be as long as might be necessary to express some meaning is that it makes the sentences of English impossible to encapsulate in a list. The number of sentences that have been spoken or written so far is already astronomically vast, new ones are being produced every second around the world by hundreds of millions of people, and no matter what the information storage resources available, the problem is that there would be no way to decide where to end the list.
Why does the "no matter" clause have no verb?

LDOCE gives the following example, which I think is close to the one in question:
No military general would willingly send his army into battle untrained and ill-prepared, no matter how well-equipped.
It's missing both subject and verb, and I suppose they're implied:
...send his army into battle untrained and ill-prepared, no matter how well-equipped [it is].
With that in mind, I suppose the CGEL sentence also has an implied subject and verb:
...and no matter what the information storage resources available [there are]...
 
  • < Previous | Next >
    Top