No. N to the fucking O

sampathronjay

Senior Member
Sinhala
Have you heard this expression? I think I heard it on a tv series....I'm also not quite sure...

Do you say like this when you want to emphasize the answer No?

No..to the f***** O
 
  • WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    I haven't heard that version at all. But there is an emphatic phrase that goes "Hell to the No" (hell no!) popular in the early 2000's although I don't hear anyone use this anymore.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think my point is that if people want to know about a word being used in context, it helps to provide an example of the word being used in context, and not a string of asterisks with an almost complete lack of context and background.

    "I think I might have heard ***** on the television. Do you say that?"

    How does that get a sensible answer?
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yes, as morior_invictus indicates, you definitely could say

    "No. N to the fucking O."

    to emphasize that "no" answer.

    I personally would never say this. But it is a way some people would emphasize their demurral.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    But it is a way some people would emphasize their demurral.
    I don't understand why anyone would choose this particular form of words. Sure, the f-word is often gratuitously inserted by people who are in that habit, but it would have to have been inserted into "N to the O", in which I can discern absolutely no meaning whatsoever.

    The only "A to the B" I'm familiar with is in the context of exponentiation, and you might instead say "A to the power B".
    You would be raising N to the Oth power. Often the number zero becomes the letter O, but raising anything to the power zero turns it to the number 1. It's not only not very emphatic, it's also totally meaningless.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree with post #8. The phrase "No to the <something>" is a reference to exponentiation. It is a mathematical pun.

    Mathematical puns are not common in English.

    Expressions invented for TV series (written by the TV writers, then spoken by the TV actors) are often not common in English.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't understand why anyone would choose this particular form of words.
    In rap music, there is/was a "figure of speech" where words are spelled "W to the O to the R to the D". This was really popular around the same time that they were putting -izzle- into random words.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've heard "A to the B to the C ... " etc. many times in US movies, usually as a spelling out of a team's name by cheerleaders.

    Presumably the OP is an elaboration of "N to the O" (meaning an emphatic "no" to some request).
     
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