no-place

Sirius77

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi,

Does "no-place" mean "anytime", for example in this sentence?

"He takes off from the no-place of talking" (R. Matalon, Sound of our steps.).
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's not at all clear what it means there. It isn't a standard expression. Is it saying that talking is not a place? Or, when you talk, do you begin nowhere but get somewhere?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Time and place (= location) are not the same thing. So no-place can't possibly mean anytime.

    "No place" is used to mean "nowhere", but I don't think that's what's meant here.

    The meaning appears to be that, in his present bereaved state of mind, when the character speaks he always begins with a negative — thus the start of everything he says is a figurative "no-place".

    Source: The Sound of Our Steps
     

    Sirius77

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hi,

    Thank you for the answers.

    Here's more of it:

    "He often closes his eyes in weariness, pain, sorrow, or for show. I prefer the fourth possibility. Again he takes off from the no-place of talking, which is the place we are standing in now, where we have always stood: “Nobody came to take me to her there in the hospital, not Sammy, not your sister, and not you. I asked and asked and nobody came,” he says, staring at the coatrack opposite.."

    What I understand from the context is that he arouses (takes off) at some point in the conversation to tell the things he wants to say: Nobody came to take me...
     
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