No quisiera correrlo capitán, pero quiere quedarse a cepillarme

barryglick

Senior Member
English - USA
¡Hola todos!

La oración a continuación estaba cortado de un episodio de La Crónicas de Zorro, un serie dibujo animado:

“No quisiera correrlo capitán, pero quiere quedarse a cepillarme.”

I’ve been struggling with it for months. Is Zorro saying here, “I don’t want to kick you out, but do you want to wash my back?” or, what sounds more natural, “I don’t want to impose, but do you want to wash my back,” or neither?
 
  • Artifacs

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    I think we would need more context for this one.

    What is the situation? Can you give some more details about the situation, please? I wonder what are the characters doing?
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Artifacs is right.
    Please describe the scene, explain what is happening and who are the characters involved.
     

    barryglick

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Well. . .Zorro has taken off his Zorro outfit and slipped into a bath after evading Monasterio’s troops by climbing into an upstairs window of the hotel. Monasterio bursts in, finding Don Diego in the bath playing his guitar. After Monasterio has looked everywhere, Don Diego says,

    No quisiera correrlo capitán, pero quiere quedarse a cepillarme​

    which I discovered means, “I don’t want to kick you out, but do you want to stay and brush my back. . .” by playing the English version of this episode.

    Thanks for taking a look at this, though. I should have thought about doing that before I bothered everyone.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Thank you. It's not clear, though, if the second part 'quiere quedarse a cepillarme' is supposed to be a question.
     

    Artifacs

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    I think you got the last part right. It seems Don Diego is asking (although Bevj has made a good point about whether it is actually a question or not) ironically that, since the captain has already invaded Don Diego's privacy, it wouldn't be too much for the captain to stay and brush Don Diego's body with a sponge.

    The first part I thought it meant, «I wouldn't want to busy you / to make you work». But some entries in the Asale dictionary for correr, correrse | Diccionario de americanismos support your version, and none of them supports mine. In that case, I think that adversative «pero» doesn't fit right with the intended meaning.

    Let's see other opinions.
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    “No quisiera correrlo capitán, pero quiere quedarse a cepillarme.”
    El personaje lo dice con ironía. Es la acepción #1 del Diccionario de americanismos. El mensaje es:
    I hope the favor I'm about to ask you doesn't make you want to leave right away, but wouldn't you mind coming over to the tub and brushing my back?
    La ironía reside en que el personaje sabe que Monasterio va a entender que en realidad le están diciendo que se marche de allí, que se vaya del lugar.

    El argumento juega con la idea de que un hombre heterosexual (y militar) no aceptaría tocar el cuerpo desnudo de otro hombre por hacerle un favor caprichoso.

    Edit: se me olvidó mencionar que vi el video. Es el final del capítulo 3 de la serie.
     
    Last edited:
    Top