No regrets

Keyopta

New Member
German
I've come across several Japanese translations for the phrase "no regrets", such as follows:

後悔無し

後悔なし

後悔しない

... Now I am wondering if all three of them are correct, or in which case which one would be preferred?

For context: I came across the first one on a site for Japanese tattoo designs (as to prevent non-native speakers from doing a big goof on their skin).
Would that actually be the most suitable option as a standalone phrase in this case then? Or are the other two equally as correct?
 
  • SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    後悔無し = 後悔なし = "No regrets," although you may regret afterwards from another point of view.

    後悔しない = "I won't regret," although you may have enough chance to regret later in your life.

    They are more or less the same and you can choose whichever.
    Only one thing to advise you is that you should never show that tattoo to Japanese people. Many of them would think it awful, weird or wack because of the cultural difference. You may choose another language, such as Chinese, if you want to make tattoo with oriental letters.
     
    Last edited:

    Keyopta

    New Member
    German
    後悔無し = 後悔なし = "No regrets," although you may regret afterwards from another point of view.

    後悔しない = "I won't regret," although you may have enough chance to regret later in your life.

    They are more or less the same and you can choose whichever.
    Only one thing to advise you is that you should never show that tattoo to Japanese people. Many of them would think it awful, weird or wack because of the cultural difference. You may choose another language, such as Chinese, if you want to make tattoo with oriental letters.
    Thank you!
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    How about... 
    悔いなし
    ?
    From a viewpoint of tattoo art, you think 悔いなし is okay and not-funny, aren't you?
    In my case, I would have to struggle not to burst into laughter when I saw a foreigner with such tattoo.

    Are you happy when you see someone with the tattoo 悔いなし according to your advice?
    Are both the horizontally written version and the vertically written version okay? I don't like neither.
    How about the font?
    Anyway, I feel pity for him/her.
    I think any combination of kanji and kana looks very very bad.
    For example, 我無後悔 might be better, although it might be weird from a language viewpoint.
    Is it only my personal feeling?
    This is a language forum, so probably we should stick to it.
    However, once we know the context and background is regarding tattoo, I believe it would be necessary to mention about cultural things from an ethical ground.
    They can't erase it easily for the rest of their life.
     
    Last edited:
    You may choose another language, such as Chinese
    For example, 我無後悔 might be better, although it might be weird from a language viewpoint.
    Is it only my personal feeling?
    Chinese here. Sorry we would definitely advice against bearing a 我無後悔 tattoo in China.
    On the other hand, 悔い無し looks much better to me if somebody shows up with this phrase in his t-shirt in China.
    The combination of kana and kanji might make it more acceptable.
     
    Displaying Chinese on one's body or shirts look a bit funny to native Chinese.
    It is even more so when the content is serious and straightforward, because it draws my attention to its language function rather than its decorative function. To me, it is no different than holding a sign with a slogan.
    Choosing words with vague meanings and in styled forms may help people to recognize it as more of a decoration or artwork.
    I guess the same is true for Japanese.
    While someone is around who has a deep understanding of Chinese, I'd ask how 暴虎馮河死而無悔 sounds?
    So, although it sounds perfect and archaic, do not use it.

    That said, I do have former colleague who used to wear in the office some ガールズ&パンツァー themed T-shirts, one of which similar to this one.
    Most people (?) do not know Japanese or watch Anime here, but given that it is all written in Kanji, it must still be catchy. (well, admittedly it might not just be because of the display of text script.)

    Back to the tattoo topic, I guess which phrase to choose may not be that important. How the artist designs may make a bigger difference.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top