No reliable supporter on issues

Worcestershire

Senior Member
"For social purpose his chosen ministerial companion was Beaverbrook. The hold upon him of that mountebank (as Clementine Churchill saw him) was extraordinary, particularly as Beaverbrook was by no means a reliable supporter on issues."

Here, there is a footnote:

"One advantage of Beaberbrook's presence was that is stimulated Churchill's reminiscent conversation. At dinner in 1 January 1944 it was reported by Colville that, when they had gone over almost the whole course of both the First and Second World Wars, Churchill endearingly turned to his naval aid, Commander Thompson, and said: "But, Tommy, you will bear witness that I do not repeat my stories so often as my dear friend, the President of the United States."

"Churchill" by Roy Jenkins

Question:

Is the connection of Churchill asking Tommy instead of Beaverbrook for support of such trivial topic to Churchill's choice of Beaverbrook as social companion a little odd?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I am not sure what you are asking here: are you asking for historical background to what Churchill said and why he said it to Commander Thompson, or have you a word or phrase of which you are unsure?
     

    Worcestershire

    Senior Member
    I am just baffled when trying to follow author's logics. To support his statement that Beaverbrook was not good at supporting Churchill on issues and thus ununworthy of being made his social companion, he picked an anecdote that Beaverbrook could not be the witness to a matter of gossipy value.

    Is author trying to be a little satirical here?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Firstly, there is no indication that Beaverbrooke was not at the dinner. In fact, the implication is that Beaverbrooke was there because Churchill's reminiscent conversation was good. We know this as Churchill discussed at length (and thus obviously recalled) incidents from two wars.
    Next, there is nothing to indicate that Churchill spoke in private to Commander Thompson, - it is likely he spoke aloud so that all could hear - we know this because Colville reported the incident and thus must have been there and heard it.
    Finally, Churchill, by saying "... you will bear witness that I do not repeat my stories so often as my dear friend, the President of the United States." admits that his reminiscences are, normally, relatively rare.

    PS I am just baffled when trying to follow author's logics. :cross:
    I am just baffled when trying to follow author's logic. :tick: Logic is uncountable.
     
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