No sé cómo Raúl se las apaña.

Cholo234

Senior Member
American English
<<No sé cómo Raúl se las apaña.>>

Would "No sé cómo nosotros nos las apañábamos" and "No sé cómo me las apañaba" be good sentences in Spanish?

(The subject sentence comes from The Ultimate Spanish Review and Practice. They translate it as I don't know how Raúl manages. They say that apañar also means to get by. 2000 Spanish and English Idioms says that ir tirando means to get by.)

What does las refer to? Are there indirect objects in these sentences?

Thanks in advance!
 
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  • Artifacs

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    Would "No sé cómo nosotros nos las apañábamos" and "No sé cómo me las apañaba" be good sentences in Spanish?
    :thumbsup: Very good ones.

    What does las refer to? What do the indirect objects mean?
    The «la/las» pronoun generally refers to, or rather supports, some unexpecified situation, but which is understood by context.

    Some other examples:

    «vérselas y deseárselas» ==> Me las veo y deseo para llegar a fin de mes ==> I'm in a situation in which it is hard to me to pay the bills.

    «no tenerlas todas consigo» ==> No las tengo todas conmigo, pero creo que puedo conseguirlo. ==> I'm in a situation in which I'm not sure about the outcome, but I think I can be succesful.

    «buscársela» ==> No sigas por ese camino que te la estás buscando ==> Don't go that way, because you're looking for a troubled situation.
     
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    Azarosa

    Senior Member
    Español (rioplatense)
    Como perfectamente lo sintetiza @Artifacs, hay en español un gran número de locuciones verbales, todas con verbos transitivos, que contienen pronombres personales átonos, casi siempre lo, la o las, cuyo referente se deduce por el contexto, pero queda sin especificar en la mayor parte de los casos. Así ocurre en pasarlo o pasarla (de una determinada manera), arreglárselas; creérselo o creérsela (actuar con suficiencia o arrogancia); dársela a alguien con queso (engañarlo); echársela (presumir) o dárselas de algo (fingir lo que no se es) jugársela (arriesgarse), entre muchas.
     

    Lamarimba

    Senior Member
    Así ocurre en pasarlo o pasarla (de una determinada manera), arreglárselas; creérselo o creérsela (actuar con suficiencia o arrogancia); dársela a alguien con queso (engañarlo); echársela (presumir) o dárselas de algo (fingir lo que no se es) jugársela (arriesgarse), entre muchas.
    ¿Usáis "verlas venir" en Argentina?
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks, guys!
    The «la/las» pronoun generally refers to, or rather supports, some unexpecified situation,
    pero queda sin especificar en la mayor parte de los casos
    Your explanations help make it seem possible to eventually understand expressions like these. (I guess that learning them could be compared to an ESL student trying to learn phrasal verbs.)

    The Ultimate Spanish Review and Practice gives these examples among several others:

    1. Cree que todo el mundo se la tiene jurada or que todos se la tienen jurada. (He thinks that everyone has it in for him.)
    2. Cualquier estudiante que se porte mal tendrá que vérselas conmigo. (Any student who behaves badly will have to explain himself to me.)
     
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    Artifacs

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    Your explanations help make it seem possible to eventually understand expressions like these. (I guess that learning them could be compared to an ESL student trying to learn phrasal verbs.)
    I wish I could recall how I managed to learn all those expressions.
    That proves that people use them a lot in a everyday basis.

    The Ultimate Spanish Review and Practice gives these examples among several others:

    1. Cree que todo el mundo se la tiene jurada or que todos se la tienen jurada. (He thinks that everyone has it in for him.)
    :thumbsup: This one uses the verb «jurásela a algo/alguien»

    2. Cualquier estudiante que se porte mal tendrá que vérselas conmigo. (Any student who behaves badly will have to explain himself to me.)
    I think there must be almost a hundred of this kind of expressions. Maybe there is a full list somewhere online.
     
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    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think there must be almost a hundred of this kind of expressions.
    Three additional definitions are found in The Ultimate Spanish Review and Practice:

    Spanish​
    English​
    componérselasto manage, get by
    echárselas de + adjective, nounto boast of being
    habérselas conto be up against, face, have to deal with
     
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