No thanks, I'm with them

jean sérien

Member
Ireland
Let's say you're in a store. The Verkäuferin asks "May I help you?" But you're there with friends who are already being helped. In English, you'd say "No thanks, I'm with them." What is the appropriate German for this circumstance? "Nein danke, ich gehöre dazu" ? "Nein danke, ich bin mit ihnen" ? "Nein danke, wir sind zusammen" ?
 
  • ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    Nein danke, ich gehöre dazu (by pointing at the others) / wir gehören zusammen.

    You would not say 'ich bin mit ihnen', not even 'ich gehöre zu ihnen' - but you could say 'ich gehöre zu denen' (by pointing at them). Denen (demonstrative pronoun) = zu diesen Leuten, zu dieser Gruppe.

    It's not terribly polite to say 'zu denen' , but it's acceptable.
     

    Hamlet2508

    Senior Member
    English
    You might even say , pointing at your friends "Danke , wir haben bereits bekommen / wir wurden bereits bereits bedient."
     

    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    You might even say , pointing at your friends "Danke , wir haben bereits bekommen / wir wurden bereits bereits bedient."
    It depends whether or not they are still in the process of being helped. "Wir haben bereits bekommen": That would not be my choice of words (but it may be more common in Austria than in Germany).

    Wir 'wurden' bereits 'bedient' (past tense depending on context). But anyway: I (personally) don't like using the term of being 'bedient'. I would rather say: Uns wird (wurde) bereits geholfen. Germans prefer "" bediening ;) "" machines rather than other people (customers). It's a matter of pride (not being a servant). Even in a coffeehouse/restaurant I would not ask for the "Bedienung". But as I said, it's a personal (and maybe regional) matter.
     
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    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    Counterquestion: Would you shout out "Bedienung (bitte)!"? I would not yell through the restaurant at all (I'm sure you wouldn't, either :)). What about asking another waitress ('Kellnerin' in German, by the way): Könnten Sie mal Ihre Kollegin vorbeischicken - or even more polite: vorbeikommen lassen?. "Hallo" wouldn't work, either. The answer could be: Hallo has a day off. "Frau Wirtschaft" is suboptimal, too. :D And your suggestion "Fäulein" would have to be pronounced "Frollein" in the above mentioned context. But the whole thing is off topic.
     
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