No wonder

Feist_5BLA

New Member
Mexico Spanish
I've been told that "no wonder" is very informal for academic writing. What other word can I use? Any suggestions?

e.g. It is used for everyday activities such as shopping, banking, and no wonder, to make new friends"

Thank you

Feist
 
  • Sabapathy

    Member
    Tamil
    It is no wonder that he got through the exam. - Informal
    Meaning about the exitement .

    It is no surprise that he got through the exam - formal
    Meaning the knowledge of passing through sucessfuly in the exam was known earlier

    - from Sabapathy
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I feel that "no wonder" does not even make sense in the sample sentence at all. I think "of course" is what was meant.

    "No wonder" means that some fact is not surprising. It can be used just before stating a fact:

    No wonder he didn't make any friends: he couldn't speak their language.

    It can also be used with the fact understood though not expressed:

    No wonder: he couldn't speak their language.

    The fact may have already been expressed:

    He didn't make any friends, and no wonder: he couldn't speak their language.

    There is no unsurprising fact expressed or implied in the sample sentence in connection with "no wonder", which comes in the middle of a list of everyday activities.
     

    Feist_5BLA

    New Member
    Mexico Spanish
    Thank you for replying!

    So, are you sure there's no way to use "no wonder" in the middle of a sentence. I have to admit that my example was a bit weird. I was just looking for a more formal word or phrase to express a contrasting/surprinsing idea.

    "This and this, and no wonder, that".

    Thanks
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm not sure it's the position in the middle of the sentence that's the problem, Feist_5BLA. Forero's post gives excellent examples of how we use "no wonder".

    For your original question, I like either "unsurprisingly" or "of course". "Unsurprisingly" has overtones of "I am not surprised about this"; "of course" implies "as you (the reader) and I both know".
     
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