no worries

yanjie.2009

Member
chinese
Dear everyone
Let's imagine a circumstance. If a person did something offending you or hurting you,he/she might say sorry to show his/her apology. Normally we can reply with "all right,it doesn't matter. My question is that can we say "no worries" in our daily dialogue ? Thanks in advance!
 
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  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    You can but I would only use "no worry/worries" in a very casual way. "No worry/worries" also implies that the offense was very small and not to even be thought of. So, it would depend on the context of the offense and whether it was major or minor and how hurt you were at the offense.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi,

    I wonder if I can use "No worries" in the following context:

    I was walking my small dog, he is afraid of big dogs. Suddenly, a big dog walked by and my little dog stood there and didn't want to go ahread (because of fear), I said to my dog:

    No worries! Come on.

    Is the bold natural?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, it is, if your dog understands English.

    By the way, the popularity of "no worries" is regional. It's especially common in Australia. It's less common in other parts of the world, though its popularity is increasing and people everywhere will usually understand it.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I wonder if I can use "No worries" in the following context:

    I was walking my small dog, he is afraid of big dogs. Suddenly, a big dog walked by and my little dog stood there and didn't want to go ahread (because of fear), I said to my dog:

    No worries! Come on.
    I wouldn't use 'no worries' in this situation. I would probably say:

    He won't hurt you. Come on!
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    The expression 'no worries' means Don't worry about it!/That's OK! in response to someone apologizing for something. I can also mean Sure! or You're welcome!. It doesn't fit in the context of reassuring a dog that doesn't want to move because he's afraid.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "No worries" sounds alien to me and I read above that it is primarily an Australian phrase. I am most likely to say, "It's no big deal", "Forget about it" and "Don't worry about it".


    < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator. >
     
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    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "No worries" sounds alien to me and I read above that it is primarily an Australian phrase. I am most likely to say, "It's no big deal", "Forget about it" and "Don't worry about it".
    It's common in Britain now*. I use it myself to mean "It's no big deal", "Forget about it" and "Don't worry about it"

    * Probably because of the popularity of Australian soap operas.
     
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