No worries.

Zhang1998

New Member
Mandarin & Cantonese - China
Hello,
I was just wondering if there's another (easier) way to say "Thanks, but you don't have to do that."
My guess is "No worries", but I am not sure if I am right.
Thanks
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Don’t have to do what? Say thank you? If so, “Don’t mention it” is one option. But my favourite is “My pleasure”.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Who is talking to you and in what context. It matters very much whether the person is a shop assistant, or a client, or a colleague or your boss.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, you have it wrong. "No worries" does not mean "No thank you". It is an acknowledgement of when someone thanks you or apologises to you.

    Example

    "Oops, I'm sorry I accidentally trod on your toe!"
    "No worries, it didn't hurt."
     

    Zhang1998

    New Member
    Mandarin & Cantonese - China
    Who is talking to you and in what context. It matters very much whether the person is a shop assistant, or a client, or a colleague or your boss.
    lets say conversation between two friends, and one offers to give a gift to another person
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would say, "No, you needn't do that."

    Note: "No worries" is rarely head in AE; I think it is primarily a BE convention.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    primarily a BE convention
    Australian, I believe. Brought to our shores (and TV screens) by Neighbours and Home and Away.

    PS. Not forgetting the contribution of a significant proportion of the transient residents of Earls Court in the late 60s and early 70s.

    EDIT - correcting a typo.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Australian, I believe. Brought to our shores (and TV screens) by Neighbours and Home and Away.

    PS. Not forgetting the contribution of a significant proportion of the transient residents of Earle Court in the late 60s and early 70s.
    OK. I stand corrected, thank you (note my humble posture). But still, rarely heard in the USA.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    lets say conversation between two friends, and one offers to give a gift to another person
    It depends whether the gift is really welcome. Are you perhaps looking for a polite way to say "Thanks, that's very kind of you, but I don't really want it"?:)

    (I remember being too polite once, and being presented with a very long, knitted mohair jacket that made me look like a large bear in full moult.):oops:
     
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