'nobody says "fancy" any more'

lampak

New Member
Polish
In one of Being Human episodes, George and Mitchell were talking about Mitchell's relationship with Annie and at some point George corrected the a-century-old vampire saying that 'nobody says "fancy" any more'. So what do you say instead of it these days?
 
  • Thelb4

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In what context was the word "fancy" originally used? The word is still used today in some senses, and has a variety of meanings, so more context is required to give an accurate answer.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    For me, (BE) to fancy, in the sense of "to be amorously drawn towards" is common and informal.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I can also say, 'Do you fancy doing X?' meaning 'Do you feel like doing X?' I assume Lampak watched the America rather than the British version of Being Human? Fancy​ isn't common in AmE today, I don't think.
     

    ogspog89

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I use that expression too. It's less ambiguous than saying "to like someone" in that context, and less blunt and informal than "to have the hots for someone".
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wouldn't take George's linguistic recommendation too seriously - despite his fluency in several languages, he's just a werewolf. And as to Mitchell, being a century old is not necessarily an impediment to remaining current with trends in language - in fact, the way he speaks is a goodly deal more hip than George could ever hope to be.
    George is uncomfortable with the term 'fancy' because he aspires to being an adult, with dignified adult feelings - he probably thinks that using terms like 'fancy' (which admittedly, is the language of the school playground) would tend to trivialise feelings which, under his world view, merit more serious consideration - at least on the face of it. Scratch a little deeper beneath the surface and you'll find that George has a great deal of difficulty dealing with his own emotions - this lack of flexibility would also tend to make him uncomfortable with 'fancy'.
     

    lampak

    New Member
    Polish
    Yes, I can also say, 'Do you fancy doing X?' meaning 'Do you feel like doing X?' I assume Lampak watched the America rather than the British version of Being Human? Fancy​ isn't common in AmE today, I don't think.
    I watched the British version.

    @Beryl Wow, when I was asking this question I actually didn't expect anyone would come up with George and Mitchell's comprehensive psychological profiles ;) Thanks :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have only ever used 'fancy' to mean 'attracted to' somebody, more precisely, very attracted by their physical appearance, um .... sexually. I'm sorry to say that hardly anybody ever attracts me like that these days, whatever their age, even if they have had their ears, nostrils and eyebrows cosmetically adjusted. I suspect that these days I might say 'I have the hots for' or even 'I lust after....' or whatever it is that younger people say that's fairly light hearted.

    I associate the other uses of 'fancy' with people much older than me, who are mostly dead. So, without young testimony that' fancy' is still used this way in BE, I'd go along with George's objections on both counts.


    If I 'fancy' a trip to Paris, I say and have always ,'I feel like going/I'd like to go/I want to go to Paris'.


    Hermione
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    In one of Being Human episodes, George and Mitchell were talking about Mitchell's relationship with Annie and at some point George corrected the a-century-old vampire saying that 'nobody says "fancy" any more'. So what do you say instead of it these days?
    Fancy that. If you do a bit of searching on the Internet you will get find plenty of fancy and a bit iof that as well.
    Fancy is still out there.

    GF..

    Even I still use fancy.. So it must be still in vogue... :D
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It may still be common in the UK, but it's not used this way in the US—although we know what it means, since we've probably read it in old books or heard it in British films or TV shows.
     
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