Nohow.

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, can I use nohow in this context.

- How do you feel?
- Nohow. (expression of anger, depression, etc)

Thanks.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'm not sure what it's supposed to mean, but I'd probably laugh and assume you were joking if you told me "Nohow" in response to "How do you feel?"

    I suspect it is different in North America.
    I don't think I've every heard anybody use this, teddy. It sounds like something that Huck would have used in Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn."
     
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    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In Russian, we also have what Encolpius suggested.

    But isn't it possible to say this in English:
    "Who were you phoning?"
    "No one.
    (=Do you care?/You don't need to know./Leave me alone.)"

    If it is, what could be said in the OP's sentence?
    "How do you feel?"
    " ??? "
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    natkretep, thanks! I'll remember this one!:thumbsup:

    ewie, cool! Your variant is close to Franco-filly's one.:)
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I can think of one example of someone saying "nohow," but he wasn't a North American: "Orders are nobody can see the Great Oz! Not nobody, not nohow!"
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    It isn't common, certainly, and actually most people who use it these days are probably quoting or at least referencing The Wizard of Oz, but that's not the main problem with your dialog, Encolpius. What nohow means is "under no circumstances" or "in no way" (see the WordReference dictionary's listing), so it just doesn't make sense the way you're using it.

    I do hear it from time to time here in North America :), but usually in combination with another negative, e.g., "no way, nohow."
     
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    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think I've every heard anybody use this, teddy. It sounds like something that Huck would have used in Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn."
    I can think of one example of someone saying "nohow," but he wasn't a North American: "Orders are nobody can see the Great Oz! Not nobody, not nohow!"
    Mark Twain and the Wizard of Oz are my two main sources for American English.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    I've heard nohow to mean "anyway."

    Don't track mud in here! I just washed the floor.
    I wouldn't track mud in, nohow. (I wouldn't do that in any circumstances, even if you hadn't warned me about your clean floor.)
     
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