...nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl

chong lee

Senior Member
türkçe
Hi,
The quote is from the story "The Stalled Ox" by H. H. Munro.

Eshley is a cattle painter.

what does it mean "accustomed to paint as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl" ? Where is the verb that usually follows "would"? (Maybe writer tries to say "he is not accustomed to paint this kind of ox" in a humurous way")

Could you help; thanks.

Adela Pingsford said nothing, but led the way to her garden. It was normally a fair-sized garden, but it looked small in comparison with the ox, a huge mottled brute, dull red about the head and shoulders, passing to dirty white on the flanks and hind-quarters, with shaggy ears and large blood-shot eyes. It bore about as much resemblance to the dainty paddock heifers that Eshley was accustomed to paint as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl.
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The missing (omitted/ellipsed/elided) verb is "bear". This bull bore about as much resemblance to the cows he usually painted, as a clan chief would bear to a tea-shop girl.
    So you are absolutely right in your guess.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It bore about as much resemblance to the dainty paddock heifers that Eshley was accustomed to paint as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl =

    It looked as much like like the cows that Eshley painted as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would look to a Japanese tea-shop girl.

    The chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would look very wild, strong, and dangerous to a Japanese tea-shop girl1, and the ox looked very wild, strong, and dangerous to Eshley.

    1 A Japanese tea-shop girl creates an image of someone who is very polite, timid, and is not used to meeting strangers.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It bore about as much resemblance to the dainty paddock heifers that Eshley was accustomed to paint as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl =

    It looked as much like like the cows that Eshley painted as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would look to a Japanese tea-shop girl.

    The chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would look very wild, strong, and dangerous to a Japanese tea-shop girl1, and the ox looked very wild, strong, and dangerous to Eshley.
    Disagree. "It bore about as much resemblance to the dainty paddock heifers that Eshley was accustomed to paint as the chief of a Kurdish nomad clan would to a Japanese tea-shop girl." How much does a Kurdish nomad chief resemble a Japanese tea-shop girl? That's how much the ox resembled a heifer.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    For me , both comments are true. (RM1 and PaulQ)
    It is not possible for both to be correct, because they are fundamentally different.

    Paul was trying to be helpful by expressing "bearing resemblance to" in a simpler way, namely as "looking like". By accident, I presume, he forgot to change the word "to" (before "a Japanese tea-girl") to "like".
    I see nothing in the original text to support the notion that the girl is being cast in the role of observer of the chief.
    The text compares two differences of size, pronouncing them to be similar: On the one hand that between the bull and the heifers, and on the other that between the chief and the girl.
    We, the readers, are invited to imagine observing all four: the huge ox, the dainty heifer, the huge chief and the dainty girl.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    It is not possible for both to be correct, because they are fundamentally different.

    Paul was trying to be helpful by expressing "bearing resemblance to" in a simpler way, namely as "looking like". By accident, I presume, he forgot to change the word "to" (before "a Japanese tea-girl") to "like".
    I see nothing in the original text to support the notion that the girl is being cast in the role of observer of the chief.
    The text compares two differences of size, pronouncing them to be similar: On the one hand that between the bull and the heifers, and on the other that between the chief and the girl.
    We, the readers, are invited to imagine observing all four: the huge ox, the dainty heifer, the huge chief and the dainty girl.
    I agree.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top