Nomas deja que lleguemos a la casa, pinche chamaco

Psudesi81

Senior Member
USA (English,German,Urdu,Hindi)
"Nomas deja que lleguemos a la casa, pinche chamaco"

what does that mean??

something about leaving the house..
 
  • Jaén

    Senior Member
    México, español/portugués/inglés
    "Nomas deja que lleguemos a la casa, pinche chamaco"

    what does that mean??

    something about leaving the house..
    Wow! Where did you find that?

    Well, I can't tell it in English, but let me try to explain it: Imagine you and your son (a child) are out of home (at a friend's, the zoo, the park...), but he misbehaved, then you are not going to tell him off in the middle of the street, so, you tell him: "I'll get even with you when we are back home!"

    (This one I have just found it in WR :D)

    The 'pinche chamaco' part is like 'you bloody kid!"

    I hope I did it right ;)

    Cheers!
     

    Anakin2099

    Member
    Peru-spanish
    It means that one son or daughter is bad behaved, and his or her parents are disgusted about sthg they have done, especially out of home. Maybe the translation would be like this:

    "You just wait we go home, mischievious little boy"

    I hope you get it!
     

    gdmarcus

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    After reading the translations by the hispanohablantes, I think I get the idea. And yes, English speaking parents often say "Just wait 'til we get home" or something like that.

    However, I think most parents would say something a little less harsh for "pinche chamaco"...perhaps something like "young man", "you little brat" or "you spoiled little brat"...(at least I never refered to my son as "you damned kid" or "you bloody kid", and "mischievious little boy" although gentle enough, is a bit out-dated).
     

    Jaén

    Senior Member
    México, español/portugués/inglés
    After reading the translations by the hispanohablantes, I think I get the idea. And yes, English speaking parents often say "Just wait 'til we get home" or something like that.

    However, I think most parents would say something a little less harsh for "pinche chamaco"...perhaps something like "young man", "you little brat" or "you spoiled little brat"...(at least I never refered to my son as "you damned kid" or "you bloody kid", and "mischievious little boy" although gentle enough, is a bit out-dated).
    Yes, you are right, we Mexican are ... what can I say? Like this! :D

    Of course, in a higher social layer this is less common.

    Pinche, I would translate to "Fuckin"

    "Fuckin kid" Pinche chamaco!

    Max
    Yes! That's more accurate to the real thing!
    :D
     
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