nominalization

homotopy07

Senior Member
Japanese
(a) his arrival in Japan to take up his new post at the football team

(b) he arrived in Japan to take up his new post at the football team


Which of the following is correct?

(1) The noun phrase (a) is a nominalization of the clause (b).

(2) The clause (b) can be converted into the noun phrase (a).

(3) The clause (b) can be transformed into the noun phrase (a).

(I am assuming (b) is a part of a sentence.)
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Could you perhaps tell us where the sentences are from, please, and also indicate which option(s) you think might be correct? Thanks.
     

    homotopy07

    Senior Member
    Japanese

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Strictly speaking, nominalisation involves turning verbs, adjectives and possibly other nouns to nouns:
    • arrive > arrival
    • strong > strength
    Obviously when you have a noun, you will need the other words to fit around the noun as required by the grammar.
     

    homotopy07

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Strictly speaking, nominalisation involves turning verbs, adjectives and possibly other nouns to nouns:
    • arrive > arrival
    • strong > strength
    Obviously when you have a noun, you will need the other words to fit around the noun as required by the grammar.
    Thank you very much, natkretep. :)

    I was assuming that the following definition was accurate:

    Definition of nominalization
    : the process or result of forming a noun or noun phrase from a clause or a verb
    Definition of NOMINALIZATION
     
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