nominated as Best Actress

Siavash2015

Senior Member
Iranian-Persian
Hello everyone.

1:She has been nominated as Best Actress for her part in the film 'Forever Together'.

does it mean she was chosen as best Actress? or her name was chosen as a candidate for ..???:confused:
2:we nominated her for the player of the year

3:He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the film.

thanks
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Nominated does not mean chosen. It means she is one of the candidates for actress of the year.

    Is there something about the definition of nominate (you can see one here) that confuses you, Siavash? I ask because it seems pretty clear to me, but if it isn't to you, let us know and we can explain more thoroughly.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    To nominate means to put forward for something. She will be one of several nominees and one will be chosen to win the award.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    The Academy picks five (in most categories; some have more or less) nominees for each award. They are the "finalists" for the award; one of them will win, the rest will not.

    Edit: Crossposted with Kate and suzi.
     

    Siavash2015

    Senior Member
    Iranian-Persian
    Thank you all for your brilliant definitions. way better than dictionaries.

    the first sentence confused me:

    She has been nominated as Best Actress for her part in the film 'Forever Together'.

    so from your definitions I figure there will be an election that will decide the best Actress in the film 'For ever Together'
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Thank you all for your brilliant definitions. way better than dictionaries.

    the first sentence confused me:

    She has been nominated as Best Actress for her part in the film 'Forever Together'.

    so from your definitions I figure there will be an election that will decide the best Actress in the film 'For ever Together'
    I'm not sure "election" is the right word (we normally use that for political offices), but yes, there will be a vote. If this is the Oscars you're talking about, the voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences decide the winner by secret ballot. You can read about the process here: http://www.oscars.org/oscars/voting
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thank you all for your brilliant definitions. way better than dictionaries.

    the first sentence confused me:

    She has been nominated as Best Actress for her part in the film 'Forever Together'.

    so from your definitions I figure there will be an election that will decide the best Actress in the film 'For ever Together'
    No, not the best actress in the film. The award is for the best performance by any actress in a leading role in any film for the year.

    In this case (as you quoted) it's for her performance in Forever Together.

    Technically, there is no such thing as a best actress award.

    The awards (Oscars) are for

    Best Actress in a Leading Role
    Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

    See3: http://oscar.go.com/nominees
     
    Last edited:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, technically technically, :D it's "Performance by an actress in a leading role." (See page 2 of the official rules.) This is presumably to prevent voting on the basis of, "Well, she really stunk in this movie, but she's clearly the best actress of the bunch."

    But sdgraham's point is well taken; it's not who was the best in that film (otherwise there would be hundreds of awards each year), it's who gave the best performance of the year.
     

    Siavash2015

    Senior Member
    Iranian-Persian
    Thank you for your informative comments.
    But actually my examples all were from dictionaries. I choose your definitions over dictionaries
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    There's nothing wrong with any of the examples you quoted, Slavash. They are all common usage. Sdgraham and I are just being pedantic, as we sometimes enjoy doing.

    Even I would not, for example, walk out of a movie saying, "Wow, that was great! She should definitely be nominated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for its 'Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role' award!"
     

    Siavash2015

    Senior Member
    Iranian-Persian
    There's nothing wrong with any of the examples you quoted, Slavash. They are all common usage. Sdgraham and I are just being pedantic, as we sometimes enjoy doing.

    Even I would not, for example, walk out of a movie saying, "Wow, that was great! She should definitely be nominated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for its 'Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role' award!"
    Thank you anyway, Ive learned so much from you guys so far:)
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    To nominate means to put forward for something
    Actually, suzi, "to nominate for" means 'to put forward for' or 'to propose for'. "Nominate", on its own, really just means 'name' or 'designate'. It's the preposition that's used with it that makes all the difference. "Nominate someone as ..." usually means that the person is chosen or appointed: He was nominated as leader of the expedition. The same goes for "nominate someone to (a position)".

    I make the point only because Siavash's first sentence in post #1 ("She has been nominated as Best Actress ...") is probably a misuse, given the context. Strictly speaking, it means that she was chosen as the best actress ... but I imagine the writer really meant "She has been nominated for ...".

    Note, Siavash, that in your sentences 2 and 3 it's "nominated for", and that others here have used "for" in their explanations:
    one of the candidates for actress of the year
    The Academy picks [...] nominees for each award.
    She should definitely be nominated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for its [...] award
    Ws
     

    Siavash2015

    Senior Member
    Iranian-Persian
    T
    Actually, suzi, "to nominate for" means 'to put forward for' or 'to propose for'. "Nominate", on its own, really just means 'name' or 'designate'. It's the preposition that's used with it that makes all the difference. "Nominate someone as ..." usually means that the person is chosen or appointed: He was nominated as leader of the expedition. The same goes for "nominate someone to (a position)".

    I make the point only because Siavash's first sentence in post #1 ("She has been nominated as Best Actress ...") is probably a misuse, given the context. Strictly speaking, it means that she was chosen as the best actress ... but I imagine the writer really meant "She has been nominated for ...".

    Note, Siavash, that in your sentences 2 and 3 it's "nominated for", and that others here have used "for" in their explanations:




    Ws
    Wow! Thank you really clever :)...so the first example is kind of incorrect? I'd been confused over that all along. so we don't say someone has been nominated as best Actress?
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    ...so the first example is kind of incorrect?
    It's incorrect if the writer actually meant "nominated for".
    so we don't say someone has been nominated as best Actress?
    In the very particular context of awards (or some other situations where a shortlist of candidates is nominated to compete), the normal terms are "nominees" and "winners", and we talk about someone being "nominated for the Best Actress ... Award" or "nominated for a Nobel Prize", and then about someone "winning" the award or prize. So, indeed, we wouldn't normally say "nominated as best actress".

    But there are many other contexts where "nominated as ..." (or simply "nominated ...") refers to the person finally chosen for a certain position: "He was nominated as CEO", or "He was nominated CEO"

    Ws
     

    Siavash2015

    Senior Member
    Iranian-Persian
    th
    It's incorrect if the writer actually meant "nominated for".
    In the very particular context of awards (or some other situations where a shortlist of candidates is nominated to compete), the normal terms are "nominees" and "winners", and we talk about someone being "nominated for the Best Actress ... Award" or "nominated for a Nobel Prize", and then about someone "winning" the award or prize. So, indeed, we wouldn't normally say "nominated as best actress".

    But there are many other contexts where "nominated as ..." (or simply "nominated ...") refers to the person finally chosen for a certain position: "He was nominated as CEO", or "He was nominated CEO"

    Ws
    Thanks a million Wordsmyth:) I got it and now I'm relieved.
     
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