nominative pronouns

elroy

Imperfect Mod
US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
My Polish textbook makes this bold statement in reference to the nominative pronouns (ja, ty, my, etc.): "...these words in spoken Polish are used optionally, and in written language are not used at all."

The part that gets to me is "at all." It simply can't be true that these words are never used in the written language.

What could he have meant by that?
 
  • iwi

    Member
    Polish
    While it is true that the nominative pronouns are used optionally, we can't say that they aren't used at all.

    In regular statement, e.g.
    On powiedział, że ...
    'on' is used only in order to put emphasize on the object, usually is omitted.

    I suppose I could help.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Quite inaccurate - you simply need to write them if you want to stress them.

    But if they are not needed, it is considered poor style to write them.

    The usual caveat applies. :D
     

    iwi

    Member
    Polish
    While it is true that the nominative pronouns are used optionally, we can't say that they aren't used at all.

    In regular statement, e.g.
    On powiedział, że ...
    'on' is used only in order to put emphasize on the object, usually is omitted.

    I suppose I could help.
    I'm sorry I made a mistake
    I meant 'subject' not 'object'
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    My Polish textbook makes this bold statement in reference to the nominative pronouns (ja, ty, my, etc.): "...these words in spoken Polish are used optionally, and in written language are not used at all."

    The part that gets to me is "at all." It simply can't be true that these words are never used in the written language.

    What could he have meant by that?
    I think it could be the formal style of, for examle; letters, press articles, etc.
    Anyway, I think it could read:
    "...these words in spoken Polish are used optionally, and in written language are not used at all unless there is a really good reason for using them."
    I cannot think of an example at the moment where I'd use them in writing as this can even be considered as rude. This is not to say that there aren't any as probably someone may spring up in a moment with one, however they are rather (very) sparing I'd say.

    I don't mean here any kind of belles-lettres as this is another kettle of fish, of course.


    Tom
     
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