nominative vs prepositional in a sentence

< Previous | Next >

Lorenc

Senior Member
Italian
I would like to know which of these two sentences is correct or preferable:
1. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом.
2. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец.
 
  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    1 is strongly preferable in modern standard Russian. The main alternative is just inverting the arguments:
    Человеком, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would like to know which of these two sentences is correct or preferable:
    1. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом.
    2. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец.
    You can put (2) in Present Tense:
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом - его отец.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would like to know which of these two sentences is correct or preferable:
    Actually, I don't understand the other participants' reasoning,:confused: and I'd say both are fine:
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец. (It was his father who had told me about it.)
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом. (The person who had told me about it happened to be his father.)
     

    Okkervil

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia (NW)
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец. (It was his father who had told me about it.)
    Если это такой перевод с русского на английский, то уж очень вольный. :) Ну а если наоборот - то явно плохой.
     
    Last edited:

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Actually, I don't understand the other participants' reasoning,:confused: and I'd say both are fine:
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец. (It was his father who had told me about it.)
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом. (The person who had told me about it happened to be his father.)
    Just reduce that to "этот человек был его отец" vs. "этот человек был его отцом" if the long phrase obscures the syntax. The first is unlikely to appear in normal speech and rather reminds of the classic writers.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    1. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом.
    2. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец.
    I'd suggest these are attempted word-for-word translations of "the person who told me about it was his father", but we need to understand the English syntax.
    Unfortunately the sentence is taken out of context. As I understand it, the rheme (the new information, the point we want to emphasise) is that I got the information from his father (and not, e.g., his brother). As English word order is relatively fixed in comparison to the much freer word order in Russian, one way we bring out emphasis in English, especially in written statements where the intonation and sentence stress is not evident, is by using cleft sentences, fronting, inversion, passivisation and other syntactic devices. and that's what happening in the English syntax here.

    Об этом мне рассказал именно его отец.
    It was his father who told me about it. The person who told me about it was his father.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    As English word order is relatively fixed in comparison to the much freer word order in Russian, one way we bring out emphasis in English, especially in written statements where the intonation and sentence stress is not evident, is by using cleft sentences, fronting, inversion, passivisation and other syntactic devices. and that's what happening in the English syntax here.
    Russian uses similar means anyway. The pragmatics and general usage of (roughly) parallel constructions may be different, of course, but still.
    Об этом мне рассказал именно его отец.
    "Именно его отец" is, in fact, unlikely to appear in the end of the sentence, because "его отец" looks like the old information here (otherwise "именно" would be hardly applicable at all; normally it's used exactly to mark out some parts of the old information, reintroducing them), and potentially because of the emphatic fronting as well.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    "Именно его отец" is, in fact, unlikely to appear in the end of the sentence
    With due respect to the fact that the native speaker here is you (именно вы ;)), I think I'd take issue with this: there's no shortage (hundreds) of examples where именно + whatever is being emphasised or specified, as in the OP's sentence, comes at the end of the sentence or clause.
    Почему нужно пить именно теплую воду (zvezdagukovo.ru); Почему моими следующими часами будут именно Apple Watch SE (appleinsider.ru); В то же время это должен был быть тренер, открытый к новым идеям, а среди свободных был именно Рахимов, поэтому выбор пал на него. (sports.ru); Почему выбирают именно нас? (mash_fak.chuvsu.ru)
    ... normally it's used exactly to mark out some parts of the old information,
    That's debatable too, but as именно isn't the topic of the thread ...
    The main problem here is that the OP's sentences have no context, so we don't know what is supposed to be the "new" or "old" information, and the translation suggestions that follow the English word for word are, in my opinion, clumsy and don't reflect the way the English syntax is operating and the idiomatic sense of the English.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    With due respect to the fact that the native speaker here is you (именно вы ;)), I think I'd take issue with this: there's no shortage (hundreds) of examples where именно + whatever is being emphasised or specified, as in the OP's sentence, comes at the end of the sentence or clause.
    Actually I meant this particular sentence only. In your examples the word order is influenced by "почему" (looks like it's the predominant situation) and by the contrastive "а", without which it wouldn't properly work again.
    The main problem here is that the OP's sentences have no context, so we don't know what is supposed to be the "new" or "old" information
    Sure. But these sentences are certainly grammatical and may correspond well to the supposed English prototype (or may not).
     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    The main problem here is that the OP's sentences have no context, so we don't know what is supposed to be the "new" or "old" information, and the translation suggestions that follow the English word for word are, in my opinion, clumsy and don't reflect the way the English syntax is operating and the idiomatic sense of the English.
    Thank you all for the answers! I'll give more context.
    1. The sentence is taken from the book 'Short stories in Russian for beginners' by O. Richards and A. Rawlings. The stories have been translated into Russian, almost certainly from English.
    2. The sentence is taken from a story about a Viking expedition to find new lands. This is the whole passage:
    [Торик] - Тот человек, который рассказал тебе об этой земле... Кто он?
    [Вождь] - Человек, который сказал мне, что эта земля существует?
    - Да, именно.
    Вождь Эскол огляделся.
    - Что такое? - спросил Торик.
    - Где Нильс?
    - Я думаю, что он на берегу с другими викингами.
    - Хорошо. Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом.
    - Его отец?
    - Да.

    3. The man in question (Niels' father) is dead when the conversation takes place (hence 'был').
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Thanks for the helpful context, Lorenc. I also ruminated about the use of был (which is important to the sense) in that sentence. As Rosett noted in #4, if the father was still alive, it could be present tense (not normally expressed at all in a declarative statement) in Russian.
    The confusion arises partly from the tense backshift in English:
    The father is still alive: The man who told me was his father :tick: The man who told me is his father :tick:

    And nice use of именно here. ;)
    Человек, который сказал мне, что эта земля существует?
    - Да, именно. ("Yes, that's the one.")

    Perhaps there's another issue also of whether the translator understood how the English syntax specifies or emphasises "his father" at the end of the sentence here. I leave it to the Russian natives to judge whether the Russian sentence, as it stands, sounds idiomatic enough in Russian - I certainly don't say it's wrong, but all my linguistic antennae are telling me именно (or maybe oтец же?* ) is the way to go here. I'll do some more research.

    *[As in Отец же его выбросил. It was my dad who threw it out.]

    On the use of the instrumental, I'm sure you know (but for the benefit of other forum users who may not) that with быть in the past tense, the attribute that is non-permanent usually attracts the instrumental, so Его отец был врачом. :tick: Его отцом был врач. :confused:o_O:cross: The "trouble" (if there is any - maybe there isn't) in your sentence is that neither of the attributes (человек, отец) is non-permanent, and perhaps that's partly why there are conflicting opinions among the Russian natives about the "correctness" or maybe just "elegance" of the Russian sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Just reduce that to "этот человек был его отец" vs. "этот человек был его отцом" if the long phrase obscures the syntax.
    That's exactly what I did, and I can easily imagine a dialogue like this:
    А: И кто (же) был этот человек (,который....)?
    Б: Этот человек был её отец.
    А: То есть именно отец девушки тебе всё рассказал?!
    As for "Этот человек был его отцом" (no context supplied), I take it to mean "Этот человек приходился ему отцом" (="Выяснилось, что этот человек приходится ему отцом").
     
    Last edited:

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    *[As in Отец же его выбросил. It was my dad who threw it out.]
    "Же" can refer to "отец" here only in a highly emphatic and generally colloquial context (= "это же оте́ц его выбросил", "его же оте́ц выбросил"). By default, with a more neutral intonation, "же" must refer to "вы́бросил" here, stressing the already known fact as the relevant point, in order to anwer some question, to refute some statement, or to request an explanation how the statement can be reconciled with the apparently contradictory fact (~~but it was thrown out by my dad (, wasn't it?)).
    Его отцом был врач. :confused:o_O:cross:
    Actually the doubtful acceptability of this phrase isn't much related to the temporariness of the attribute ("его отцом был китаец" has similar issues). But it threatens to become an extensive discussion not really related (at least directly) to the original question.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    That's exactly what I did, and I can easily imagine a dialogue like this:
    А: И кто (же) был этот человек (,который....)?
    The start is almost worth Pushkin's quail already (just replace "который" with "что"). :) No, I don't think most people will express their thoughts that way.

    If you have doubts regarding the pragmatics, swapping the instrumental arguments is still an option.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    ... both are fine:
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец. (It was his father who had told me about it.)
    Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом. (The person who had told me about it happened to be his father.)
    С учётом появившегося в конце дискуссии контекста (спасибо Lorenc за прояснение головоломки) соглашусь с вышесказанным, при этом отмечу, что первая фраза даже лучше согласуется с диалогом.
     

    Okkervil

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia (NW)
    "Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец"
    (очень странная, двусмысленная фраза, возможна в спонтанной речи)

    "Человеком, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец"
    (просто двусмысленная фраза)

    "Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отцом"
    наиболее вероятно имеет смысловой акцент на отцовстве (хотя, добавив еще всего одно слово, можно было внести полную ясность).

    Если же вождь не хотел намекать на отцовство, куда проще было бы не наводить тень на плетень, а сказать: "Мне об этом рассказал его отец".

    Иначе остается только предположить, что вождь этот какой-то странный парень и выражается как-то туманно.
     
    Last edited:

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Вообще русский, который не может похвастаться относительной компактностью английских придаточных (одно только относительное местоимение в три-четыре слога длиной - это всё-таки не шутки), действительно не склонен и лепить их без особой необходимости, это верно.
    проще было бы не наводить тень на плетень, а сказать: "Мне об этом рассказал его отец".
    Ну можно и добавить выразительности. Например:
    Это его оте́ц рассказал мне об этом.
    Но бесконечные повторения придаточных, причем даже без попытки хотя бы удалить в вопросе повторяющееся определяемое ("Который сказал мне, что эта земля существует?") - это явно просто не слишком осознанное калькирование типичных английских конструкций.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "Человек, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец"
    (очень странная, двусмысленная фраза, возможна в спонтанной речи)

    "Человеком, который рассказал мне об этом, был его отец"
    (просто двусмысленная фраза)
    Можете ли вы конкретно раскрыть оба смысла, согласно вашим утверждениям? На мой взгляд, смысл в каждой фразе один.
     

    Okkervil

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia (NW)
    Можете ли вы конкретно раскрыть оба смысла, согласно вашим утверждениям? На мой взгляд, смысл в каждой фразе один.
    А здесь нет никакого смысла. Два суровых, косноязычных викинга стоят перед отвесной скалой. На скале надпись: "Здесь был Вася!"
    Один спрашивает:
    -- Тот человек, который был здесь... Кто он?
    После многозначительной паузы второй важно отвечает:
    -- Человек, который был здесь, был Петиным отцом.

    Замена "был кем?/чем? (творительный падеж)" на "был кто?/что? (именительный падеж)" не делает диалог яснее.
    a) Вася был Петиным отцом.
    b) Вася был Петин отец.
    c) Васей был Петин отец.

    Не понятен даже сам вопрос ("Кто здесь был?" или "Кем он является?"). Смена настоящего времени на прошедшее еще добавляет путаницы.
     
    Last edited:

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    А здесь нет никакого смысла. Два суровых, косноязычных викинга стоят перед отвесной скалой. На скале надпись: "Здесь был Вася!"
    Один спрашивает:
    -- Тот человек, который был здесь... Кто он?
    После многозначительной паузы второй важно отвечает:
    -- Человек, который был здесь, был Петиным отцом.

    Замена "был кем?/чем? (творительный падеж)" на "был кто?/что? (именительный падеж)" не делает диалог яснее.
    a) Вася был Петиным отцом.
    b) Вася был Петин отец.
    c) Васей был Петин отец.

    Не понятен даже сам вопрос ("Кто здесь был?" или "Кем он является?"). Смена настоящего времени на прошедшее еще добавляет путаницы.
    Почему «путаница»? Все формы ответа полностью однозначны. Разница между двумя предложенными в ОП вариантами только в том, что творительный падеж подчёркивает качество, в котором выступает человек (как отец), а именительный - сущность (он отец).
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Разница между двумя предложенными в ОП вариантами только в том, что творительный падеж подчёркивает качество, в котором выступает человек (как отец), а именительный - сущность (он отец).
    С рациональной точки зрения - да, но всё же предложение - это поток, который слушатель анализирует "на ходу". Во флективном русском языке этот поток предполагает, что порядок слов может быть свободным, но именно падежи, как правило, расставляют всё по местам. В этом плане "Вася был Петин отец", можно представить как нечто вроде "Вася!" + "Был Петин отец". (преувеличение, но я хотел лишь указать на гибкость синтаксиса и предпочтительность однозначности связей). Кстати, в настоящем времени в живой речи скорее всего вставят "это" ("Вася - это Петин отец") - в порядке той же ясности и однозначности.
     
    Last edited:

    Okkervil

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia (NW)
    Все формы ответа полностью однозначны. Разница между двумя предложенными в ОП вариантами только в том, что творительный падеж подчёркивает качество, в котором выступает человек (как отец), а именительный - сущность (он отец).
    "Полностью однозначны", но есть разница. Тоже хорошо сказано.
    Разница вполне достаточная, чтобы сделать эти сомнительные фразы ответами на совершенно разные вопросы. В одном случае речь пойдет о факте отцовства, а в другом о том, что кто-то кому-то что-то разболтал. Это разные сюжеты.

    И всё бы ничего, если б хоть вопрос-то был задан чётко, Но увы.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Кстати, в настоящем времени в живой речи скорее всего вставят "это" ("Вася - это Петин отец") - в порядке той же ясности и однозначности.
    «Это» тоже опускается в живой речи: «Вася - Петин отец».
    Но есть ещё одно соображение, связанное с тем, что творительный падеж совпадал раньше с именительным по форме, что закрепилось в некоторых выражениях и в современном языке.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    «Это» тоже опускается в живой речи: «Вася - Петин отец».
    Да, но все же есть интонационное фокусирование либо опора на контекст.
    Кстати, Вы правы насчёт аттрибутивности (качество vs сущность, #23). В настоящем времени творительный падеж как-то не востребован в обыденной речи (по формуле "Вася является Петиным отцом") видимо потому, что прошлое всегда предполагает временность свойства, а в настоящем этих рамок нет, и потому "является" звучит так неестественно (если только не поставить опять-таки временные рамки: "является в течение уже пяти лет....")
     

    Eirwyn

    Member
    Russian
    «Это» тоже опускается в живой речи: «Вася - Петин отец».
    Не вижу никакой корреляции с разговорностью. По-моему, «Вася — Петин отец» и «Вася — это Петин отец» — это просто две разные конструкции с разным значением. В первом случае описывается связь между уже известными слушающему лицами, во втором — объясняется, кто вообще такой этот Вася, которого говорящий только что упомянул в первый раз.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Не вижу никакой корреляции с разговорностью. По-моему, «Вася — Петин отец» и «Вася — это Петин отец» — это просто две разные конструкции с разным значением. В первом случае описывается связь между уже известными слушающему лицами, во втором — объясняется, кто вообще такой этот Вася, которого говорящий только что упомянул в первый раз.
    Ваша точка зрения на эти конструкции справедлива, но она нисколько не опровергает сказанного про «разговорность».
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    По-моему, «Вася — Петин отец» и «Вася — это Петин отец» — это просто две разные конструкции с разным значением. В первом случае описывается связь между уже известными слушающему лицами, во втором — объясняется, кто вообще такой этот Вася, которого говорящий только что упомянул в первый раз.
    А почему обязательно в первый раз? "Скажите, (наш общий знакомый) Вася — Петин дядя, да?" "Нет, Вася — это Петин отец»
    Мне кажется, "это" попросту предваряет предикативное определение ("Петин отец"), резервируя под него "смысловую ячейку". Т.е. с помощью "X — это ...", легче однозначно передать эту связь без дополнительной паузы и выделения интонацией. А кто-то нерешительный скажет вообще как-нибудь так: "Нет, знаете, Вася, он — Петин отец" (я даже не знаю, как здесь правильно расставить пунктуацию).

    "Кошка — млекопитающее" (понятно в тексте, сложно передать тире в речи).
    "Кошка — это млекопитающее" (понятно в речи, излишне в тексте).
    "Моя кошка была (— ) сущее чудовище" (возможно, требуется интонирование).
    "Моя кошка была сущим чудовищем" (с падежом синтаксис яснее, но теряется эмоциональная выразительность).
     
    Last edited:

    Eirwyn

    Member
    Russian
    "Скажите, (наш общий знакомый) Вася — Петин дядя, да?" "Нет, Вася — это Петин отец»
    У меня лично последняя фраза вызывает чёткое ощущение, что вопрошающий не до конца уверен, кого вообще в данном случае подразумевают под Васей, и отвечающий прекрасно это понимает. Вообще в целом это больше походит на диалог из учебников для иностранцев, чем на фрагмент из живой речи. Вопрос о наличии родственных связей между двумя хорошо известными участникам беседы людьми должен был бы строиться несколько по другому шаблону:
    «— Скажите, Вася — он Пете дядя, да? — Нет, (он ему) отец.»
    либо
    «— Скажите, Вася — он Пете дядей приходится, да? — Нет, отцом.»

    С личными именами, не отягощёнными определителями, частица «это», судя по всему, работает как маркер, сигнализирующий о привязке этого имени в данном контексте к какой-то конкретной персоне. Дать ей формальное определение в прочих случаях я как-то затрудняюсь.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top