Non-consensual Duke of Edinburgh.

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Dimitris29

Senior Member
Greek
Hi.

A guy strands his girlfriend over to the Penines in the UK, because she wanted to do some thinking about their relationship.
But he's so innocent and stupid that thought she needed a large space.

The dialogue goes like that.

He: Love, I'm sorry.
She: You bloody should be.
He: Forgive me, please.
She: I needed time to think, not some kind of non-consensual Duke of Edinburgh.

I know it's a reference for Prince Charles and some kind of hunting, but I can't tell the meaning of it.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I expect it’s a reference to the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme that sets challenges for young people.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    No, it's a reference to Prince Philip (the Queen's husband) and it refers to the Duke of Edinburgh's Awards scheme. This is an organisation that undertakes adventurous challenges for teenagers and young people for which they can win a Bronze, Silver or Gold award, depending on how difficult the challenge is. Typically, it involves tough hardships, such as walking and camping in wild and remote places with no mobile phones etc. They are 'character-building' exercises which can teach leadership skills and teamwork.

    What she is referring to in your text is that she feels as if she is on one of these challenges without agreeing to participate (non-consensual).

    The reference would be widely understood by British readers.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Oh, I see.
    I thought the 'non-consensual' part was some sort of a sex scandal reference.
    Thank you very much.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Oh, I see.
    I thought the 'non-consensual' part was some sort of a sex scandal reference.
    Thank you very much.
    "Non-consensual" simply means that a person does something despite not agreeing to do it. It is often used in the context of sex, where someone may be forced to perform an act or may be in a situation where it is not possible to refuse (drugged, depending on the other person for employment, etc.) but its meaning as a phrase has nothing to do with sex.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Oh, yeah, I get this.
    Having in mind Prince Charles, I thought of that sex scandal with his now wife, back in the 80s-90s, whatever.
    I mean, it was something inappropriate for a royalty, if I am not mistaken.
    Anyway, Chez pointed out above, that the reference was for Prince Phillip, the Queen's husband, so my thought was completely wrong.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you think the reference is to Prince Philip's alleged non-consensual sexual transgressions, I suggest you provide a context or source for the text you quote.

    Otherwise the meaning is unclear.

    (You choice of strands is also unclear.)
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    strand [sb] (over) = Leave [sb] without the means to move from somewhere, desert [sb] somewhere.

    No, I just said I thought it was reference for Prince Charles' scandal or so-called scandal. I don't know...
    My query is solved.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We don't know the source of your quote so it's hard to suggest alternatives, but your use of 'strand' is incorrect.
    'Non-consensual sex' means rape. The definition of rape is broader than might be thought, in the UK at least. The woman's use of 'non-consensual' in this particular context has a powerful double significance and might even have a comical effect depending on the context.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Alright.
    In my first post, I make perfectly clear that this is a situation where a stupid guy deserts (strands over) his girlfriend to the wilderness to do some thinking.
    However, she didn't have this in mind when she asked for a bit space to do some thinking about their relationship.

    For the 'non-consensual' part, I thought due to the fact that this phrase is spoken in sequence with the Prince (thought was about Charles), that it has something to do with sex stuff.
    Never implied rape, even though I get that this phrase does imply such things.

    It's a total comedic situation.

    I dug it from a british comedy series. Can't say the name for various reasons.

    I hope I made myself clear this time and sorry if I hadn't until now. :)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In my first post, I make perfectly clear that this is a situation where a stupid guy deserts (strands over) his girlfriend to the wilderness to do some thinking.
    You seem to think “strand over” is a verb meaning to abandon someone. It’s not. But you can “leave someone stranded [somewhere]”.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Basically the joke is "I said I needed space. But I didn't mean this much space." It sounds like a comedy.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He stranded his girlfriend in the wilderness. (There's no "over".)
    As far as I know, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker-Bowles relationship was entirely consensual. :)

    We can Google - it's from Cuckoo Series 4 Episode 6 from 2012 - hardly a secret. ;)
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Oh, I see where I was wrong.
    Yes, this is what I meant in my first post.

    A guy stranded his girlfriend to the Penines in the UK.

    That's right Myridon. However, there is a reason I could not name the show.
    Anyway, thank you.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Oh, I see where I was wrong. Yes, this is what I meant in my first post.

    A guy stranded his girlfriend over to the Penines in the UK
    That still doesn’t work. “Over” is inappropriate. And it’s unusual (in my opinion) to talk of stranding someone. It’s almost always the past participle, “stranded”, that’s used.

    See the example sentences for 1.1 here: strand | Oxford Dictionaries
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    He stranded her in the Penines.

    People travel over or through mountains, but while you're there you are in the mountains.

    Oddly enough, when you are in the mountains or going through them, you are not actually under the surface, generally. You are between the slopes of the mountains but we still say you are in the mountains.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    He stranded her in the Penines.

    People travel over or through mountains, but while you're there you are in the mountains.

    Oddly enough, when you are in the mountains or going through them, you are not actually under the surface, generally. You are between the slopes of the mountains but we still say you are in the mountains.
    Good to know. Thank you.
     
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