Non Dormit Qui Custodit

  • winnie

    Senior Member
    italy, italian
    trekkgirl said:
    please tell me what this says. it is on my family crest. "Non Dormit Qui Custodit"

    welcome trekkgirl!

    it's Latin, a rough translation is "who guards doesn't sleep"

    HTH
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    winnie said:
    welcome trekkgirl!

    it's Latin, a rough translation is "who guards doesn't sleep"

    HTH

    it's not that rough, it's really accurate. ;)

    I'd use an "he" at the beginning.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Tabac said:
    My guess is that it is an abridged form of a line from the 21st Psalm: "He that keepeth Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps".

    It's Psalm 121 in King James
    Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.
    The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand

    or Psalm 120 in the Latin Vulgate.
    ecce non dormitabit neque dormiet qui custodiet Israhel
    Dominus custodiet te Dominus protectio tua super manum dexteram tuam

    and since the Lord is the keeper here, I'd look elsewhere for the origin of the quote.
     

    Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    Brioche said:
    It's Psalm 121 in King James
    Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.
    The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand

    or Psalm 120 in the Latin Vulgate.
    ecce non dormitabit neque dormiet qui custodiet Israhel
    Dominus custodiet te Dominus protectio tua super manum dexteram tuam

    and since the Lord is the keeper here, I'd look elsewhere for the origin of the quote.
    Typo of omission: 121st Psalm is correct....good catch. I don't where else to get the exact quote, but I think it's a good take.
     

    xav

    Senior Member
    France
    I think there's no other origin - as Tabac says, it was abridged.

    In Hebrew, it's
    Hinné lo yanoom, velo yishan, shomer Isra'El
     

    Hansen of Denmark

    New Member
    english
    Only few survived the masaacre of the Macillop Clan at the hands of English redcoats in 1745 in Scotland. As the Macillop Clan were the kings "watchers", therefore the "Non Dormit Qui Custodit" on your family tree
     
    Only few survived the masaacre of the Macillop Clan at the hands of English redcoats in 1745 in Scotland. As the Macillop Clan were the kings "watchers", therefore the "Non Dormit Qui Custodit" on your family tree

    I am a McKillop, and though I know the motto Non Dormit etc to be correct, I have no recollection of very few of us being left after a massacre in 1745. That would, actually, have been after the battle of Culloden which took place 16th April 1746, which was when all the serious killing began. As to the McKillops being the kings watchers, Im not too sure about that one either. We were certainly pipers to the house of stewart, but if you have any other info, Id be really pleased to see it.
     

    CRGH

    New Member
    English UK
    This emblem appears in 'Devises et Emblemes Anciennes & Modernes' (1699), which can be found online, on a site hosted by the University of Illinois. It may or may not helpful to know that it appears there with a French translation: 'Qui le gouverne, ne dort pas.'
     

    Yulan

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hello everybody :)

    I must be astray, but could "Qui custodit" be translated as "Guardian" or "Sentinel"?

    "The guardian/sentinel does not sleep" ?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    "Qui custodit" is a relative clause, meaning "who guards".

    Your translation catches the sense of the Latin, but not the syntax. It misses the relative clause.
     
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