Non-English English words

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  • Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    In Brazil home office refers to what I would generally call remote work or working from home.

    I wonder what I would have to call it in Germany when somebody from the Home Office were working remotely from home.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Is home office supposed to mean teletrabajo? I would take home office to mean literally what it says it is.
    I see your point. And you are right, it's not the same. However, home office it's not something that I hear here. Something like tengo la oficina en casa is more usual but it's not either something that you hear too much.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    "Der Mitarbeiter des Innenministeriums ist im Homeoffice" ? :D
    The logical reply: Yes we know he is with the Home Office - but where is he right now?

    As we say in German - Alle Klarheiten beseitigt
    Translates approx to: All clarity eliminated.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    In the context of this current pandemic, I find French people are using home office to mean télétravail.
    Especially in this context, everybody uses "télétravail".
    Never heard "home office" in any media or elsewhere in France.

    In Germany, they use "Homeoffice" for working at home.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Well perhaps Dreyeckland/Alsace region differs from the capital, in that we have tens of thousands of crossborder-workers who work in Switzerland and Germany. A healthy cross contamination in the misuse of English?
    It seems to me télétravail is being misused in French too, as in the context of the pandemic most of the distant working is on an informal basis. Whereas télétravail refers to a contractual arrangement.
    The link in my earlier post #195 has a nice graphic showing this nuance:
    Le télétravail est donc à distinguer du travail à distance « occasionnel », souvent appelé « home office », « mobile working » ou encore « work-from-home » (voir notre infographie). Ce dernier est envisagé par les entreprises comme une souplesse offerte à leurs salariés qui peuvent ainsi prendre de manière ponctuelle une ou deux journées « mobiles » par mois pour travailler depuis leur domicile – par exemple parce qu’ils attendent le passage du plombier ou parce qu’ils ont besoin de se concentrer pour un travail de rédaction.
    Ou je me trompe.
     
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    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Well perhaps Dreyeckland/Alsace region differs from the capital, in that we have tens of thousands of crossborder-workers who work in Switzerland and Germany. A healthy cross contamination in the misuse of English?
    I think so.
    Le télétravail est une activité professionnelle effectuée en tout ou partie à distance du lieu où le résultat du travail est attendu. Il s'oppose au travail sur site, à savoir le travail effectué dans les locaux de son employeur.
    Concernant les salariés, le ministère de l'Économie français définit le télétravail comme « une forme d'organisation du travail dans laquelle un travail qui aurait également pu être exécuté dans les locaux de l'employeur est effectué par un salarié hors de ces locaux de façon volontaire »
    Wikipedia
    When you look up "homeoffice" on Wikipedia, you are redirected to télétravail.
     

    Mick

    Senior Member
    British English
    Italian has adopted a fake anglicism to refer to work from home, which is smart working. I think no other non-English speaking country uses it (let alone English-speaking countries).

    If you can read Italian, here's an interesting article on why the expression makes little or no sense: Terminologia etc. » » Lavorare da casa non è smart working!

    "Smart working" is indeed the expression used here in Italy for what we'd call working from home (I came on here to check that was the case, having lived here so long I was starting to doubt whether perhaps it was being used elsewhere). Another common expression that Italians are horrified to learn isn't typically used by mother-tongue English speakers is "open space [office]" whereas "open plan office" is the accepted term in English.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    "Smart working" is indeed the expression used here in Italy for what we'd call working from home (I came on here to check that was the case, having lived here so long I was starting to doubt whether perhaps it was being used elsewhere). Another common expression that Italians are horrified to learn isn't typically used by mother-tongue English speakers is "open space [office]" whereas "open plan office" is the accepted term in English.
    Despite the general term "open plan office", "open space" IS a term generally used in architecture, and also for the layout of offices.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    An example of a real pseudo-Anglicism in Russian is фейс-контроль (féys-kontról', i.e., *face control, although контроль is actually a Gallicism in Russian). It also should be noted that the practical usage of the word in Russian is prone to semantic expansion - for example, people may use it to describe passport control in international airports.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I wouldn't get past face control at any of its night spots.
    Hard to say, I'm not a big fan of those activities whatsoever.

    By the way, I doubt the explanation of the phrase in the article is correct. «Kontról'» isn't fully equivalent to English «control», and here it must rather mean «check», i.e. checking visitors' faces at the entrance (the explanation through the idea of "keeping the face of the establishment" seems too deep).
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    It also should be noted that the practical usage of the word in Russian is prone to semantic expansion - for example, people may use it to describe passport control in international airports.

    The question is rather why is it "passport control" in English? :confused:

    I don't see any difference between checking one's face and one's passport.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Apparently during this pandemic, Le Monde at one stage referred to 'le health' (Beurk !)

    Mind you, it can work other ways. The Guardian reported once that owing to the virus Parisian libraries were closing and people couldn't take the books they had borrowed back ...

    Ho, hum.
     
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