Non Finite Verbs

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jalaluddin

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Dear Expert,

I want to know that all the form of Infinitive and Participle are non-finite or just simple Infinitive and Present participle...?


finite adjective ( GRAMMAR )

/ˈfaɪ.naɪt/ adj



In a form that shows the tense and subject of a verb, rather than the infinitive form or a participle.

In the following sentence 'go' is finite: "I often go to the cinema."

I often go to play cricket. here to play is non finite

INFINITIVE'S FORM:

Present = to love
present continuous = to be loving
present infinitive = to have loved

PARTICIPLE'S FORMS:

Present = Loving
Past = Loved
Perfect Participle = Having loved.

Can any of them be used for present \ past \ future as Non Finite...?

(1) I am due to have gone to the airport. I shall go, once I check the flight is on schedule. ( I am due to go)

(2) He forgets most thing, but having said that, he always remembers my
birthday.

(3) Having been to the bank, I can come to pay your debt at your home
tonight.

(4) Having finished my office work, I go to gym everyday at 19hrs.

Generally, Present participle is used...but just to know the grammar
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Dear Expert,

    I want to know that all the form of Infinitive and Participle are non-finite or just simple Infinitive and Present participle...?
    Hello, jalaluddin

    I wouldn't call myself an expert:D. But yes, all forms of the infinitive and participle are non-finite, to my mind: none of them indicates person/number/tense.

    To have loved/to be loving etc show perfect[ive] or progressive aspect, not tense.
     

    jalaluddin

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Thanks Loob, Could you tell me the way I have used them in examples are true...? :confused:

    specially, perfect infinitive and perfect participle
    , In general, Perfect participle is used to show finished action but
    in cambridge dictionery, they have given the special usage of having said that, In routine life's activity or in the sense of one action happens / happened / or will happen just after other finished action.

    Thus, We use perfect participle for this finished action.

    My ultimate question is all the forms of said Infinitive and Participle be used in all tense...?
     
    Last edited:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thanks Loob, Could you tell me the way I have used them in examples are true...? :confused:
    Yes, in general, the way you used the perfect participle and the perfect infinitive in post 1 is correct:).
    specially, perfect infinitive and perfect participle, In general, Perfect participle is used to show finished action but
    in cambridge dictionery, they have given the special usage of having said that, In routine life's activity or in the sense of one action happens / happened / or will happen just after other finished action.
    "Having said that" is a special case, in that we often use it as a set phrase. So I might say, for example:
    My favourite colour is red.
    Having said that, I like blue a lot, too.
    My ultimate question is all the forms of said Infinitive and Participle be used in all tense...?
    Yes: the perfect infinitive/participle and the progressive infinitive/participle generally just show what the time relationship is with the main verb - that verb can be in any tense:

    Having eaten my dinner, I went out.
    Having eaten my dinner, I am going out.
    Having eaten my dinner, I will go out.
    Having eaten my dinner, I would go out if I had the money for a taxi.
    Having eaten my dinner, I had gone out. But then I suddenly realised I had left my keys at home.

    Do come back if this is still unclear:).
     
    Last edited:

    jalaluddin

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Dear Loob,

    Thank you. Your answer has enriched my understanding. I want to know why such grammar books say that perfect participle is used only with finished action. whereas action can be shown finished not only past but even in future.

    The example you have mentioned are superb.
     
    Last edited:

    jalaluddin

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Hello Ms. Hanifa,

    The way you have asked It seems you must be knowing the answer...
    please, don't remain it secret, clear it....knowledge is power and power is within gerund or participle...! just kidding....;)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ms. Loob,
    "Having eaten my dinner, I went out."
    In the above sentence, is 'Having' a gerund or a participle?
    It's a participle for me, Er. Hanifa.
    I want to know why such grammar books say that perfect participle is used only with finished action. whereas action can be shown finished not only past but even in future.
    I think you have given the answer yourself, jalaluddin:):thumbsup:.
    The perfect participle is used for an action which is finished by the time of the action in the main verb.
     
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