Non fuyan las vuestras mercedes

speedier

Senior Member
Context. A line from the book Don Quijote.

He finds himself at the inn, which he imagines is a castle, and sees some young lasses standing at the door of the tavern.

Wanting to calm them down he started to speak like the knights in shining armour that he had read about in his books.

¡Non fuyan las vuestras mercedes ...!

my try:

Don't ? your ladyships?

Any help will be much appreciated
 
  • Valeria Mesalina

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Hello,

    I am.

    It means "don´t flee away, you gentlemen/ladies".

    Vuesa merced or vuesas mercedes was the way Middle Ages people greeted someone they were not acquainted with and also their lords and ladies.

    Nowadays we have "usted", which is a way of saying "vuesa merced" but shortened.

    By the way, no one would address a maid at an inn as "vuesa merced".
     
    Last edited:

    speedier

    Senior Member
    Ahhh, of course, don't flee your ladyships / ladies! Thanks Valeria, and Aztlaniano.

    Edit - and also for the interesting snippet on how "usted" came into being (I guess that fuir is the old word for huir?)
     
    Last edited:

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Ahhh, of course, don't flee your ladyships / ladies! Thanks Valeria, and Aztlaniano.

    Edit - and also for the interesting snippet on how "usted" came into being (I guess that fuir is the old word for huir?)
    The Latin was fugīre, as in the saying "time flies" tempus (?) fugit
    Incidentally, I would suggest that Flee not would be more in keeping with the style.
     

    Adolfo Afogutu

    Senior Member
    Español
    (I guess that fuir is the old word for huir?)
    Hola:
    Sí, tienes razón, la efe fue cambiada por una hache, como sucede con muchas otras palabras.

    El grafema H se conserva en español puramente por razones etimológicas, puesto que no tiene valor fónico (es mudo). Indica las más de las veces el lugar donde existía una F en latín (como en hijo, del latín filius)
    Fuente: Wikipedia

    huir
    (Del lat. vulg.fugīre, por fugĕre).(DRAE)

    Saludos
     

    speedier

    Senior Member
    Yes, as the story unfolds, it becomes clear that not only does he see the inn as a castle, but the serving wenches are, to him, "bellas doncellas",
    and so flee not gentle maidens seems to fit very well.

    Thanks again to all concerned.
     

    DCPaco

    Senior Member
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    "Flee not your graces..."

    I just wanted to clarify that "ladyship" and "lordship" is not "vuestra merced."

    Vuestras mercedes = Your graces

    Ladyship and Lordship = Señorías


    "I do entreat your grace to pardon me."--Shakespeare

    Here are some of my suggestions for this quote:

    Le suplico a vuestra merced que me perdone.

    Le suplico a vuestra merced que me disculpe.

    Le ruego a vuestra merced que me perdone.

    Le ruego a vuestra merced que me disculple.

    For "Lordship," here's an example:

    http://www.cah.utexas.edu/db/dmr/pdf/e_bx_3562.pdf

    "God keep your Lordship many years."

    "Dios guarde a vuestra señoría muchos años."

    "Dios guarde a su señoría muchos años."
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    The Quijote is a renaissance work, not a mediæval. As such, I would propose "damosel," which is an earlier (but not mediæval) spelling for "damsel."
    It's true the work is Renaissance, but our hero is trying to relive the Middle Ages. If "damosel" was already a bit antiquated 500 years ago, that would be the perfect translation.
     
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