"non-linear" child development

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xtof4g

New Member
French
Hello guys,

I'm PhD student and I'm currently searching a word related to child development process.
In my experiement a developemental shift in both behaviour(qualitative) and performance(quantitative) was observed for the age of 7. More precisely, both of them increase dramaticaly before this age while, after this age their increase is not as remarkable as observed before 7.

So in order to caracterize this result I have to find a word in order to explicit this trend.
"Non-monotonic" is not appropriate because it is defined by a U-shape developemental trajectory. Furthermore, "non-linear" does not fit because this term is related to a different theoretical field.

Do you have any suggestion please ?

Thanks a lot for helping.

Christophe
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Christophe, and Welcome to the Forum! :)
    It seems as though you're looking for a technical term that describes the shape of a graph - would that be correct? :)
     

    iMak7

    Senior Member
    Russian, English
    Hi!

    I am a math major (but soon I am going to change my major though). You said that '"non-linear" does not fit because this term is related to a different theoretical field', but calling a U-shaped function non-linear is just legit even though the first adjective that comes to my mind is parabolic or parabola-like! But as far as I understand it's just not what you're trying to convey. So I would like to know the degree to which the term you're looking for should be mathematically valid. To make myself clear, what is the target audience, is it intended for people who are used to mathematical rigor in everything you write or is it aimed at masses and you just have to describe your trend in an academic yet understandable and way. Anyways, here's what I can suggest:

    1) irregular (suitable for the second case lacks any mathematical rigor but clearly demonstrates your point);
    2) non-uniform (the best I can think of for both cases, even though it would still make a mathematician first think about a non-uniformity in terms of continuity of a function, but it's a flexible term though)
    You can elaborate and rephrase it as a 'non-uniform (cor)relation' or something like that, can't think of anything better as of now.
    Hope this helps!
     

    xtof4g

    New Member
    French
    Hello,

    Thanks Beryl from Nothallerton !

    Is is indeed inspired by a graph but I have to report this result in a text.
     

    xtof4g

    New Member
    French
    Hi iMak,
    Thanks for your post.
    I'm currently writting my first scientific paper. I'm working on child developement. "Non-linear" in experiemental psychology is related to the dynamical system theory. In this field, "non-linear" means a qualitative shift in behaviour (for instance a shift from walk to run pattern). We actually did not observe that king of critical shift. result showed that the improvement of the ability to control of a visual-motor coordination is very important before 7. It still improves after 7 but less than before. It seems to "reach" an asymptot. (sorry for the inaccuracy of my explaination ;))
     

    iMak7

    Senior Member
    Russian, English
    Okay, I was not aware of this meaning of 'non-linear' and was pushing in the area I am familiar with.:) I perfectly understand the kind of plot you get but I doubt I can suggest something more suitable than I did in my previous post.
     

    xtof4g

    New Member
    French
    iMak7,

    Actually, non-uniform sounds good ! "Non-uniform" is also related to movement (velocity and acceleration) and I have to explain a result which change over time (e.g. age) so, it seems to fit !

    Thank you !

    Xtof.
     
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