Non-loan terms for subatomic particle types

inquisitiveness1

Senior Member
English - USA
Hi, so kind of a weird question, but in most dictionaries, the words for things like, proton, electron, etc are simply just English loans. However, I have found that for proton and electron at least, there are non-English, natively* formed words, like أُوَيِّل (uwayyil - "proton") & كُهَيرِب (kuhayrib - "electron"), that seem to be formed by using diminutives of the concept alluded to in the Greek source of the English words (pro - first; elec - electricity; جسيم jusaym "particle" doesn't do that exactly, but it also is a diminutive like the others). I know that such words are less commonly used than the English loanwords, but my question is are there any other such words that are in use to any extent? Like I don't know, something like حُيَيد (ḥuyayd - "neutron"; diminutive of "neutral(ity)") or سُرَيع (suray3 - "tachyon"; diminutive of "speed(y)") or anything like that (even if not diminutive, but referring to a subatomic particle). In many dictionaries online or otherwise, I didn't even find the two that I eventually confirmed do exist, so that's why I am asking here.

*The k-h-r-b root for electricity isn't native per se, as it is derived from a Persian loanword for {amber --> electricity}, but the specific form of the word here is an Arabic pattern applied to that root, so a native neologism.
 
  • Jamal31

    Banned
    American English
    This is very interesting and I would like to know as well.

    I remember seeing the word 'atom' (ذَرَّة) in the Quran, but have never heard of any subatomic words like the ones you mentioned. The word for atomic nucleus is نواة الذرة, but I don't know if that's part of what you're looking for.
     
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    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    Even if there were translations for all subatomic particles, which I highly doubt, the transliterations are widely used.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Yes, those translations were efforts from مجامع اللغة العربية to find Arabic equivalents of new terms instead of relying on transliterations, but such efforts failed with too many words. The very few ones that met some success, like المذياع for radio راديو, or شطيرة for sandwitch ساندويتش haven't even fully replaced the transliterations.
     

    inquisitiveness1

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Even if there were translations for all subatomic particles, which I highly doubt, the transliterations are widely used.
    Yes, those translations were efforts from مجامع اللغة العربية to find Arabic equivalents of new terms instead of relying on transliterations, but such efforts failed with too many words. The very few ones that met some success, like المذياع for radio راديو, or شطيرة for sandwitch ساندويتش haven't even fully replaced the transliterations.
    I knew that even if such words existed, they would be less commonly used than the foreign loanword. I was just asking to know if there were more of such native neologism for my curiosity.

    In classical (mediaeval) Arabic the literal translation for “atomos” is جزء لا يتجزأ.
    That reminds me of another chemistry diminutive جزيء juzayʾ "molecule" (although neither "atom" or "molecule" are subatomic though...)
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    I knew that even if such words existed, they would be less commonly used than the foreign loanword. I was just asking to know if there were more of such native neologism for my curiosity.
    Oh. I believe that there isn't. I looked up a number of them and all I found was transliterations.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Just in case it might be of interest or relevant: In Urdu, the neologisms seem to be all based on Arabic derivatives:

    proton - اولیہ
    neutron - تعدیلیہ
    electron - برقیہ


    atom - ذرّہ (also particle, etc.) and جوہر (which is a معرب of Persian گوہر - used more in other contexts)

    • atomic - جوہری
      • subatomic particles - زیر جوہری ذرّات
    nucleus - نویہ (atomic) and مرکزہ (cellular)
     
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