Non-native bugs disappear from the country more easily than native ones.

< Previous | Next >

Ryovzx09

Senior Member
Mandarin-China
Hi,
With the following paragraph:
Holeman hopes that Debug Fresno can hit its year-end target of reducing the local female Aedes aegypti population by at least 90 percent. The data so far looks 'promising', she says. Holeman points out that in misquito control, "we tend not to say the word 'eliminate'," but she wouldn't be upset if this non-native bug disappeared from the country she calls home.

Q: What can be inferred from the paragraph?
A. The year-end target of Debug Fresno seems hard to realize.
B. The local female Aedes aegypti population has been dropping.
C. It's just a short-term aim for Debug Fresno to eliminate mosquitoes.
D. Non-native bugs disappear from the country more easily than native ones.

The answer key is D, but I find only C to be the wrong choice.
Would you agree?
Thanks.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Surely the answer key should be B: The data so far looks "promising".

    The data looking promising rules out A, and there is nothing in the passage that says anything about C and D.
     

    Ryovzx09

    Senior Member
    Mandarin-China
    Surely the answer key should be B: The data so far looks "promising".

    The data looking promising rules out A, and there is nothing in the passage that says anything about C and D.
    I have two follow-up questions:
    1) Suppose it's at the initial stage of the 'elimination project', with the 'promising' data being a, say, 5 percent reduction in the number of bugs, would you say there's still a very long way to go before achieving the target, but not 'hard to realize'?
    2) What does 'wouldn't be upset' in the last sentence mean? Does it mean that she somehow relates to the fact that something might eventually disappear, which might otherwise make her sad, if it's not a harmful bug?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have two follow-up questions:
    1) Suppose it's at the initial stage of the 'elimination project', with the 'promising' data being a, say, 5 percent reduction in the number of bugs, would you say there's still a very long way to go before achieving the target, but not 'hard to realize'?
    To say it is 'hard to realize' would need some support in the text. There is nothing at all to say it is hard, and there are two comments that suggests it might be achieved ("Holeman hopes..." is the other). If the promising data was a 5% reduction against a 90% target, then "a long way to go" would be fine.
    2) What does 'wouldn't be upset' in the last sentence mean? Does it mean that she somehow relates to the fact that something might eventually disappear, which might otherwise make her sad, if it's not a harmful bug?
    "Wouldn't be upset" is the kind of understatement that is quite common in English, and it means "really pleased". She would be really pleased if this bug disappeared entirely from the country. "This bug" is Aedes aegypti; although it is not explicitly mentioned in this sentence, there is nothing else it can be. "This" can only be used for something mentioned very recently that is singular.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top