Non-sense sentences that sound sound

< Previous | Next >

Carlos Martínez Riera

Senior Member
Spain / Spanish
I'm looking here for combinatons of written words that, when pronounced alowd, tell a different story than the one you read.
One coud call them phrasal homophonies, if I dare giving a name to such thing.

Example:
FR: La bande des six nez ---> La bande déssiné
L'ultime atome ----> L'ultimatum

In other languages?

Carlos
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Todo por que rías >> todo porquerías

    Las obras de ayer >>> las sobras de ayer

    Les Luthiers, grandes hitos >>> Les Luthiers, grandecitos

    Les Luthiers, unen canto con humor >>> Les Luthiers, un encanto con humor


    Todas estas frases corresponden a obras del grupo argentino LES LUTHIERS.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Carlos Martínez Riera said:
    I'm looking here for combinatons of written words that, when pronounced allowed, tell a different story than the one you read.
    One coud call them phrasal homophonies, if I dare giving a name to such thing.

    Example:
    FR: La bande des six nez ---> La bande déssiné
    L'ultime atome ----> L'ultimatum

    In other languages?

    Carlos
    Un autre, très connu, en français :
    Et le désir s'accroît quand l'effet se recule... (P. Corneille) :D
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    There was an extremely funny comedy sketch by Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett (written by the former - a true comedy genius) that was based around exactly this kind of word-play. A man goes into the hardware shop and starts ordering things from the shop owner: "I want four candles" (said in a Cockney accent). The owner puts four candles on the counter. "No, I said four candles". The owner looks confused. "You know, fork 'andles - 'andles for forks"...
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    Carlos Martínez Riera said:
    I'm looking here for combinatons of written words that, when pronounced alowd, tell a different story than the one you read.
    One coud call them phrasal homophonies, if I dare giving a name to such thing.

    Example:
    FR: La bande des six nez ---> La bande déssiné
    L'ultime atome ----> L'ultimatum

    In other languages?

    Carlos

    one should call them un 'kakemphaton', at least that's the french name. i just learnt it 2 seconds ago. :eek: :eek:
     

    Asmodeo

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Una de Quevedo:
    El tipo apostó con unos amigos a que era capaz de llamar coja a la reina. Y en una recepción en palacio le ofreció a la reina dos flores mientras decía:
    "Entre el clavel y la rosa, Su Majestad escoja".
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    fetchezlavache said:
    victor hugo : il sortit de la vie comme un vieillard en sort. (il sortit de la vie comme un vieil hareng saur)
    Fetchez - could you just explain this one to me please. I thought that you would have to say vieux hareng saur because "hareng" is masculine and "h aspiré" isn't it? Sorry I don't mean to be pedantic, and if the venerable V Hugo said it I'm sure it's right, but I can't see how:(

    Thanks!
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    fetchezlavache said:
    you are right timpeac, but there is nothing wrong with a little imagination is there ? ;)
    Haha, no of course not, I just wanted to make sure I understood. I see, one rule for good old Victor another for the rest of us...:eek: ;)
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    timpeac said:
    Haha, no of course not, I just wanted to make sure I understood. I see, one rule for good old Victor another for the rest of us...:eek: ;)
    Kakemphaton... vient de kakon = mauvais en grec. ;)

    Un autre :
    Six russes c'est six Slaves, s'ils se lavent c'est qu'ils se nettoient, si ce n'est toi c'est donc ton frère !
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Twelve hundred Turkish prisoners were mistakenly killed in 1799 by Napoleon after he ordered them set free. He complained about a coughing fit he was having, but his words, "Ma sacrée toux," (my bloody cough) were misunderstood. Instead his men thought he uttered "Massacrez tout" (kill them all), so they opened fire, killing every prisoner.

    Jana
     

    zebedee

    Senior Member
    Gt. Britain - English
    Jana337 said:
    Twelve hundred Turkish prisoners were mistakenly killed in 1799 by Napoleon after he ordered them set free. He complained about a coughing fit he was having, but his words, "Ma sacrée toux," (my bloody cough) were misunderstood. Instead his men thought he uttered "Massacrez tout" (kill them all), so they opened fire, killing every prisoner.

    Jana
    Hmmmm...at the risk of sounding pedantic, surely it would have been "Massacrez tous" with the "s" at the end of the word pronounced, therefore the two sentences no longer sound the same?


    EDIT: Just found this on the page Jana recommends in another thread:
    http://www.snopes.com/language/misxlate/toux.htm
    This story is also a bit absurd in a linguistic sense. The command "massacrez tous" is roughly the equivalent of an English speaker's issuing the unusual order "Massacre all!" Just as an English speaker would almost certainly use the more common verb "kill" and a more specific object (e.g., "Kill them all!" or "Kill all the prisoners!"), so a French speaker would order "Tuez-les tous!" or "Tuez tous les soldats!" And although the phrases "ma sacrée toux" and "massacrez tous" are similar in pronunciation, there is a distinctiveness to their rhythms that enables a French speaker to distinguish between them, just as English speakers can discern the difference between the spoken sentences "I want to see them all" and "I want to see the mall." (Moreover, unlike many other French words, the final 's' in "tous" is sounded; therefore "toux" and "tous" have distinctly different pronunciations akin to the English "too" and "twos.")
     

    Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    The problem here is "massacrez tous" is wrong in French, it should be: "massacrez-les tous"...
    And "Massacrez tout" means "massacre everthing", which does not work either.
    So I think this is just one of the numerous legends running about Napoleon!! ;)
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    If one wanted to sound very scornful, one might very well say "massacrez tout" (slaughter everything) even for people. All right, maybe this isn't something Napoleon was likely to say (or isn't it ? we don't really know), but this is something his soldiers might have understood.

    That said, I don't believe this really happened. It's a bit too much. I mean the soldiers should have asked him to confirm the order, at least that.
    Moreover, I have no reason to disbelieve what is said in the page zebedee an jana have mentionned. (Only, as I pointed out, I don't think the "phonetic/grammatical" argument is that valid).
     

    o'clock

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Asmodeo said:
    Una de Quevedo:
    El tipo apostó con unos amigos a que era capaz de llamar coja a la reina. Y en una recepción en palacio le ofreció a la reina dos flores mientras decía:
    "Entre el clavel y la rosa, Su Majestad escoja".
    Otra de Quevedo:

    Se apostó que llamaría "puta" a la reina. Aprovechando que estaba resfriada le dijo: ¿Su Majestad esputa?

    Del verbo "esputar": Arrancar flemas y expulsarlas por la boca.
    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Interesting thread indeed, but I have the feeling kakemphatons work mostly in French, no? Is there an English name for it?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    They regularly feature as the two opening (across) clue answers in the concise crossword in the i newspaper in the UK (other newspapers may have them, too). They are called 'ninas' in English.

    For example,

    'little devil' (3) = imp
    'fur, for example' (4) = hair

    Nina: 'impair'.

    Other types of nina are:

    Ninas
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hmmmm...at the risk of sounding pedantic, surely it would have been "Massacrez tous" with the "s" at the end of the word pronounced, therefore the two sentences no longer sound the same?


    EDIT: Just found this on the page Jana recommends in another thread:
    Ma Sacrée Toux!
    In the French Algerian war, radio operators were in the habit of shortening commands they transmitted, for expediency. Some troops in the highlands found an unarmed shepherd cowering in a gully. So they radio their commanding officer at the base of the hill for instructions, as to what to do with the suspect. He says tell them “to bring him down here, so I can question him and decide if he is just a simple shepherd”. The radio operator transmitted the imperative “Descends-le!” (Bring him down!). A echoing shot rang out, followed by orders barked by the officer trying to find out who fired their weapon, on the hill top. The radio operator went pale, in slang “Descends-le!” means shoot him. True story, retold (in his published memoirs) by the chaplain, who consoled the radio operator before his return to France.
     
    Last edited:

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    @L'irlandais's war story reminds me of the (possibly apocryphal) story of a French General visiting a contingent of Breton troops during World War I in order to raise morale.

    'Where do you want to go, mes braves?' asked the General.
    'Ar gar, ar gar,' replied the Bretons to a man.

    The General was very pleased. He thought that they were keen to go to the front line, and misheard what he thought was 'À la guerre'.

    What the Bretons were actually saying was they wanted to go home to their kinsfolk!
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    The break-through of computers has brought hudreds of English based words into Finnish language, usually either pronounced or written in a Finnish way and connected with Finnish endings for verbs etc. Examples:
    to boot = buutata (ta = verb infinitive ending, a = connecting vowel)
    to render = renderöidä (öidä = verb infinitive ending)
    to ban = bannata
    to scan = skannata
    to select = selektoida
    to share = sharettaa
    trolling = trollaus
    etc.
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    • Kóbor ló / kóborló = stray horse / rover.
    • Egy kis pesti vendéglőbe egy kis pesti vendég lő be.
      egy = a/an
      kis = small
      vendéglő = retaurant
      vendég = gues
      Pest = side of Budapest
      Kispest = district of Budapest
      lő be = he/she is shooting in
    • A te tűd/ a tetűd = your needle / you louse.
     

    jsvillar

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    A couple of riddles with the answer within. Everybody knows them, so they are only good for children:
    -Oro parece, plata no es/plátano es: Looks like gold, it is not silver/it is banana
    -Blanco por dentro, verde por fuera, si quieres que te lo diga espera/es pera: White on the inside, green on the outside, if you want the answer, wait/it is pear.

    We also have a whole tradition of 'hyerogliphs', which are puzzles in the newspapers with visual clues that shape the words or syllabes of the answer.
    As an example, the hardest I know (so hard to solve that it is more a joke than a real hyerogliph) is like this:
    Where are you going to swim? Answer: O OO O o O
    Translated it is like this:
    Nada redondel aros arito nada=Nadaré donde la Rosarito nada
    Nothing, loop, rings, little ring, nothing=I will swim where Rosarito swims
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    1. Etymology of the word mondegreen:
    In a 1954 essay in Harper's Magazine, [Sylvia] Wright described how, as a young girl, she misheard the last line of the first stanza from the seventeenth-century ballad The Bonnie Earl o' Moray. She wrote:
    When I was a child, my mother used to read aloud to me from Percy's Reliques, and one of my favorite poems began, as I remember:
    Ye Highlands and ye Lowlands,
    Oh, where hae ye been?
    They hae slain the earl o' Moray
    And Lady Mondegreen.
    The correct fourth line is "And laid him on the green".
    (from Wikipedia, s.v. Mondegreen)

    2. Ninas (#24) '
    As a child, I used to look carefully at Al Hirshfield's amazing caricatures in the Sunday New York Herald Tribune, and then as an adult in the New York Times, to see if I could spot all the Ninas. At some point he started adding a numeral next to his name to indicate to his fans how many Ninas there were in the drawing.

    3. Speaking of the crossword ninas, Arnold Schwarzenegger (when he was governor of California) once included fuck you as an acrostic in a letter in which he vetoed a bill proposed by the state legislature.
     

    mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    Man enquires at a couple’s home where the husband has advertised a “car for scrap” in the local paper without telling his better half. The wife answers the door.
    Next thing, slightly bewildered, she is on the phone to her husband at work to let him know there’s someone at the door about the ad for “calf’s crap”.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top