None of the rough

*cat*

Senior Member
Slovene
Hello!

Can you please explain to me what does that mean?
Here's the whole context:

He asked: "You acted as companion and also looked after the house?"

"Oh yes, indeed. I did most of the cooking - I quite enjoy cooking - and did some dusting and light housework. None of the rough, of course." Her tone expressed a firm principle. He who had no idea what “the rough” was, made a soothing murmur.

What does that mean? That her work wasn't "inaccurate" or that it wasn't "hard" or ... ?

I hope you'll be able to help me. Thank you.
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi.

    I suppose light housework would consist of easy chores: dusting, perhaps sweeping a bit in the kitchen, washing the pots, etc.
    So I'm guessing rough housework is when you do the complicated or hard tasks, like laundry (by hand), heavy cleaning and the like.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    She did none of the rough housekeeping. She didn't repaint bedrooms, she didn't climb on ladders to get spiderwebs out of corners, she didn't shampoo carpets--she just did light housekeeping.
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    She did none of the rough housekeeping. She didn't repaint bedrooms, she didn't climb on ladders to get spiderwebs out of corners, she didn't shampoo carpets--she just did light housekeeping.
    Painting rooms is not considered to be housework, but the other examples are. You can add scrubbing floors, cleaning toilets and windows, moving furniture to vacuum all as rough housekeeping.
     

    *cat*

    Senior Member
    Slovene
    So, I could write "nothing rough" (rough as an adverb and not noun) instead?

    But I'm wondering... He (the man that's talking to her) also didn't understand what she meant by that word. Maybe it's more complicated?
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    He does not do housework and has not interviewed to hire a housekeeper. This is out of his area of knowledge, like many men who see housework as women's work.
    Just kidding, I know all you men have been well trained by your mothers. I'm sure this passage was taken from a very outdated source. (My husband does all the rough housekeeping at our place.)
     
    So, I could write "nothing rough" (rough as an adverb and not noun) instead?

    But I'm wondering... He (the man that's talking to her) also didn't understand what she meant by that word. Maybe it's more complicated?
    That's because one wouldn't normally say "rough housework", maybe heavy or difficult but not rough. But that seems to be what the word implies here. And you could say nothing rough.
     

    *cat*

    Senior Member
    Slovene
    Thank you all very very much!


    tepatria,
    He does not do housework and has not interviewed to hire a housekeeper. This is out of his area of knowledge, like many men who see housework as women's work.
    Just kidding, I know all you men have been well trained by your mothers.
    :) The man's a lawyer...

    I'm sure this passage was taken from a very outdated source.
    From a book that was written in 1953.

    (My husband does all the rough housekeeping at our place.)
    :thumbsup:


    mjscott,
    "I don't do windows!"
    I had to smile to this one! :)


    Have a nice weekend!
     
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