None of us knew what we were doing, so anyone can see in

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missgirl

Senior Member
Persian
“Wells,” Shirzad says, when Ahmed breaks the silence to ask. “The water companies have been bombed. The water pipes aren’t flowing. Didn’t you notice this morning?”
I’d noticed. Of course I’d noticed—the toilets not flushing, the rusty water coming out of our faucets. But, like the messes I left in my bedroom for the housecleaner to tidy, I’d stupidly assumed that someone else would take care of it.
Mustafa says: “Yeah, I helped put together an outhouse yesterday, None of us knew what we were doing, so anyone can see in. Here’s my street. See you tomorrow, if the bombs don’t get you first.”

Dear Friends,
what does it mean? : Yeah, I helped put together an outhouse yesterday, None of us knew what we were doing, so anyone can see in.
Thanks.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    An outhouse is, specifically, a separate small building that contains a toilet and nothing else. It usually has no plumbing, but is built over a hole in the ground that waste will fall into. The picture shows an outhouse. They are generally built to hide the person inside from people outside, since in many cultures people want privacy when the use a toilet.
    toaleta-slawojka-kibelek-uzywany.jpg
     

    missgirl

    Senior Member
    Persian
    An outhouse is, specifically, a separate small building that contains a toilet and nothing else. It usually has no plumbing, but is built over a hole in the ground that waste will fall into. The picture shows an outhouse. They are generally built to hide the person inside from people outside, since in many cultures people want privacy when the use a toilet.
    View attachment 47085
    I did not get this part: None of us knew what we were doing, so anyone can see in.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The builders either didn't know what they were building or they were bad builders.
    They must have built this toilet so badly that people could look into it and could see the people inside as they emptied their bowels or bladders.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Outdoor toilets do usually have a way of looking in, but it is only a little circle cut so high up in the door that you can't accidentally see in.
    This one has a heart shape cut into it and some appear to have a crescent moon shape like this ) . This one is probably American. I think 'outhouse' is the American term. In the UK it could be called an 'outdoor privy'.
    1600843084459.png

    The word outhouse or outbuildings in the UK, or should I say England, can be used for any building sperate from the main living accommodation.
     
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