none the wiser

  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It means, essentially, that someone is unaware of a circumstance or event. It's often used in a deceptive way ie:

    First Person: "Let's not tell our classmate that we copied his study notes"
    Second Person: "Yeah, we'll pass the test and our classmate will be none the wiser"
     

    Red Red Rose

    New Member
    english speaking (usa)
    Thanks. I APPRECIATE YOUR RESPONSE AND I GET THE MEANING. WOULD YOU PLEASE GIVE ONE MORE EXAMPLE.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    what the phrase "none the wiser" mean? And in what context is it generally used?
    Hello Red Red Rose, and welcome to WordReference.

    We really expect you to provide some context.
    For example, where did you hear/read this phrase?
    What was the sentence?
    Where did it come from?

    It would help us to help you if you provide more background to your question. Of course, perhaps Dimcl's post explains all you need to know.
     

    LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I agree with Dimcl.

    It has a further usage in BE, where the literal sense is of a person knowing no more than they did before - even though they might be expected to be better informed.

    In deception instances, such as Dimcl gives, this would be a common BE example:

    'Your mum will go mad when she finds out I'm staying overnight'.
    'No, we'll go out by the front door, nip in again at the back, and she'll be none the wiser'.

    It can also be used in exactly the same sense to refer to unhelpful explanations. Examples:

    'I asked where we were, and he pointed to a sign in Greek, which left me none the wiser'.

    'I asked a simple question in the WR forum, and got a long, confusing post in reply from LouisaB, which left me none the wiser'.

    Louisa
     

    joe chip

    New Member
    italian
    It means, essentially, that someone is unaware of a circumstance or event. It's often used in a deceptive way ie:

    First Person: "Let's not tell our classmate that we copied his study notes"
    Second Person: "Yeah, we'll pass the test and our classmate will be none the wiser"
    hi,
    I'm not english, I'll do my best.
    I've found this: "...neither of them the wiser." I suppose it has the same meaning of: "none the wiser". could you please confirm that, or tell me if it is any different?
    thanks,
    jc
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top