Norwegian: dekket

littlepond

Senior Member
Hindi
Hei alle sammen!

I came upon this sentence in a dictionary (hence, there's no context, but I guess that won't be required, as my issue is about the grammar): "Jeg vil ha mine utgifter dekket".

Now I understand that "dekket" is the past participle of the verb "dekke", acting as kind of an adjective here. My question is, since "mine utgifter" is plural (my expenses), why does "dekket" not take an extra "e" ("dekkete") at the end, following the usual conventions of an adjective? Does one change the rule for past participles when used as adjectives? Or is that adjectives ending in a single "t" do not take anything? (I searched in some grammar books, but couldn't find any answer.)

Thanks in advance for all answers!
 
  • raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Hei! I am not a grammar expert. There are other members of the forum who can explain the grammar much better then me (I hope some of them will do it).

    But I think the main point here is that "dekket" isn't used as an adjective. It is a verb - a part of "vil ha dekket".

    An alternative word order (just as correct) is "Jeg vil ha dekket mine utgifter". Does this word order make more sense to you?
     

    Einherje

    New Member
    Norwegian
    Actually in this case it is possible to translate the sentence word for word to English.
    "Jeg vil ha mine utgifter dekket" = "I will have my expenses covered."
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I'm not quite sure about that. I read "Jeg vil ha mine utgifter dekket" as "I want my expenses to be covered".

    But the word "vil" can be ambiguous in Norwegian, meaning both "want to" and "is going to", so - without any context - both interpretations are possible.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    But the word "vil" can be ambiguous in Norwegian, meaning both "want to" and "is going to", so - without any context - both interpretations are possible.
    Also with "will" to an extent, though the "want" meaning is rare now. However, when you ask "Will you marry me?", you are not really asking for an opinion on what may happen in the future.
     
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