Norwegian: Du liksom

sjiraff

Senior Member
English
Hello all,

I've seen this expression said a fair amount of times but I don't know if I even know what it's meant, or when you can say it. I can't remember all the times I've seen it, it so I found this example:

For barnets beste, du liksom
(http://www.aftenposten.no/meninger/sid/For-barnets-beste_-du-liksom-6665499.html)


Does it express some kind of doubt over something someone has said? Am I right in saying it can be percieved as sarcastic?

Thanks
 
  • sjiraff

    Senior Member
    English
    It means "as if"
    Oh I see, it like when someone says "Særlig" for "as if" too?

    Some of the ways I've seen "du liksom" said seem a bit different, for example I saw the title of a negative review of a hotel in Malaysia "Malaysia du liksom" - should there be a comma here?

    Thanks!
     

    sjiraff

    Senior Member
    English
    It is sooner something you do not believe. Such as "Jeg snakker veldig bra fransk!" "Veldig bra, du liksom..."
    Ahh I see, and the "du" doesn't have anything to do with the person you're talking to right? Like the expression "du verden" - it's never going to change since it's not referring to the person you're talking with?

    Also, would you say this was synonymous with "særlig" (Not meaning particular but, "as if")?

    Thanks!
     

    myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I wouldn't say that særlig and du liksom are synonymous. They both express disbelief, but I interpret them in different ways:

    1) "Jeg snakker veldig bra fransk!" "Særlig!" - you don't believe it.
    2) "Jeg snakker veldig bra fransk" "Veldig bra, du liksom" - you know that the person does speak French, but you wouldn't call it very good.
     

    sjiraff

    Senior Member
    English
    I wouldn't say that særlig and du liksom are synonymous. They both express disbelief, but I interpret them in different ways:

    1) "Jeg snakker veldig bra fransk!" "Særlig!" - you don't believe it.
    2) "Jeg snakker veldig bra fransk" "Veldig bra, du liksom" - you know that the person does speak French, but you wouldn't call it very good.
    Ahh I see, so in the second one it's sort of more connected to the "veldig" doubting the degree.

    Thanks guys!
     

    cevita

    Senior Member
    Norway - Norwegian (Bokmål)
    Uhm, no :p

    I'd translate "du verden" to "My oh my", but it can also be used as an expression when someone tells you sor shows you something that surprises or is astoundishing.

    Du verden som plantene vokser (My oh my these plants grow)
    Du verden hvordan hun kan danse (my oh my the girl can dance)

    Kid: "Mamma, pappa se hva jeg kan" ("Mum, dad look at what I can do")
    Parents: "Nei, du verden" (My oh my (I had no idea you could do that)")

    A: Water is wet
    B: Du verden (my oh my (I did not know that)

    Don't know if this shed some light on your question? :)

    As for "du liksom" when meaning "oh stop it you" I think this image sums it up :p
    http://i1.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/345/169/bc7.png
     

    Batseba

    New Member
    Norwegian
    I'd say "du liksom" expresses sarcastic disbelief or refusal of a preceding actual or inferred statement or suggestion. It may very well be accompanied by scoffs and rolling eyes. And yes, I think it has the same meaning as the sarcastic "særlig", or the English "yeah, right". So "Malaysia du liksom" could be uttered in a number of different contexts, for example: The speaker has been shown pictures from "Malaysia", which he recognises as actually being from Thailand: "Malaysia du liksom, det her er jo Thailand!" The speaker's potential travelling companion has suggested going to Malaysia, but the speaker finds the suggestion pretentious and overly enthusiastic, and would much prefer to just holiday in Denmark, as they always do, or just stay at home: "Malaysia du liksom, kva i alle dagar skal me der å gjere?"

    The "du" in "du liksom" can point back to the person who originally came up with the "stupid" statement or suggestion, but it can also be used without such an addressee. I don't think it has much in common with "du verden", as the latter expresses neutral or even positive surprise and amazement.
     
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